Gynopedia needs your support! Please consider adding content, translating a page, or making a donation today. With your support, we can sustain and expand the website. Gynopedia has no corporate sponsors or advertisers. Your support is crucial and deeply appreciated.

Last modified on 21 November 2018, at 18:10

Burkina Faso

Flag of Burkina Faso.svg.png

OVERVIEW

Generally speaking, Burkina Faso is a country where the majority of women struggle with poverty, and women may have limited reproductive autonomy. Women are typically expected to marry and have children at a young age, and they are also expected to have many children. Genital cutting is common (about 75% of women, ages 15 to 49)[1], and husbands and mother-in-laws often play a dominant social role in a woman's life. However, there are resources available to women, including NGOs, nonprofits, private clinics, and public hospitals.

Contraceptives are available, and though a prescription is technically required to obtain birth control pills, we need to gather more information about how widely this is enforced. You can find emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) without a prescription as well. However, regular birth control pills and emergency contraceptive pills are not commonly used by the majority of women in Burkina Faso. Regarding STIs, there are no residency or travel restrictions related to HIV status. The country has also made tremendous progress regarding HIV transmission and treatment. Between 2010 and 2016, the HIV infection rates decreased by 45% in Burkina Faso and AIDS-related deaths decreased by 13%. As of 2018, Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) may be technically available in Burkina Faso, but it remains extremely rare.

Menstruation is a taboo topic, and some girls may not even be aware of menstruation before they personally experience it. For girls in poor and rural communities, there may be limited sanitation resources for their menstrual hygiene, especially in their own schools, and they may choose to skip school during part or all of their periods.

In terms of pregnancy, Burkina Faso does technically allow maternity leave for women, though many women may not be able to take off this time, as they may be unofficially employed or self-employed. According to the most recent data, Burkina Faso has the 31st highest maternal mortality rate in the world, though the country has made efforts to improve maternal health.

Finally, abortion is only legal in certain circumstances, and it is not available upon request. The majority of women who receive abortions in Burkina Faso do not go through legal channels. Rather, they turn to clandestine and underground abortion providers, who may be untrained or not properly equipped. For this reason, women do suffer from abortion-related complications in Burkina Faso.

Contraception (Birth Control)Edit

General Note: There are many types of contraceptives, also known as "birth control," including IUDs, oral contraceptives, patches, shots, and condoms, etc. If you would like to view a full list, click here.

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

In Burkina Faso, you technically cannot purchase oral contraceptives (birth control pills) over-the-counter at pharmacies. A prescription is required by law.[2] [3] However, we do not know if this is widely enforced in all pharmacies (if you have this information, please update this page).

Generally speaking, many Burkinabé women hold limited autonomy to make decisions about their reproductive health on their own. Women are typically expected to marry and become mothers at a young age. Once they are married, their choices regarding contraceptive use, including birth spacing, may be largely or entirely in the hands of their husbands and/or mother-in-laws.[4] They are also typically expected to have large families[5] -- and, in fact, Burkina Faso has the seventh highest birth rate in the world (nearly 6 women per child).[6] One of the most common forms of contraception for Burkinabé women is period abstinence[7]

It is important to understand that Burkinabé women often live in poverty, and they may struggle with issues such as female genital cutting, child marriage,[8] forced marriage, unwanted pregnancies, and a lack of sex education schools.[9]

According to a 2015 United Nations report, it was found that about 19% of Burkinabé women (who were of reproductive age and married/in unions) used any form of contraception, including traditional methods. This rate was slightly higher to the West African regional average for contraceptive use among women in 2015 (about 16%). The most common contraceptive methods for Burkinabé women were found to be birth control pills (7%), contraceptive implants (4%), contraceptive implants (6%), and birth control pills (4%). Male condoms were used by some couples (about 2%). While some couples opted for sterilization, the rates were rather low (less than 1% for women and 0% for men). There were especially low rates of usage for IUDs (less than 1%) and the vaginal barrier method (less than 1%). Traditional methods were also used at a very low rate, such as the rhythm method (less than 1%) and withdrawal (practically 0%).[10]

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

  • For women who cannot afford to purchase contraceptives at pharmacies, they may consider visiting an NGO, such as Marie Stopes International - Burkina Faso. This NGO focuses on providing free or low-cost health care services to women in need around the globe, including in Burkina Faso. "Our founding clinic offers a full range of reproductive health and family planning services. We lead the field in clinical quality standards and client focus, doubling as knowledge centres for the organisation’s outreach teams and government clinics. Our three outreach teams comprise a nurse, driver, assistant and doctor who travel to hard to reach parts of the country by boat and car, offering long acting and permanent (LAPM) contraceptive services to those who need them most." Address: MSI Burkina Faso, Blvd Tengsoba face à la gare routière, Patte d’Oie, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Telephone: +226 50 31 12 42/43, Fax: +226 50 31 12 46
  • For women who can afford to purchase contraceptives at pharmacies, there are many options to choose from in Ouagadougou.

CostsEdit

Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)Edit

Important Notes: Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC as soon as possible after unprotected sex. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click here and here.

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

In Burkina Faso, you can obtain emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) at pharmacies, private clinics, family planning centers, and social marketing programs. You can obtain some ECPs without a prescription, but some other ones require a prescription. The lowest cadre of health worker that is allowed to distribute ECPs is midwives.[11]

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

  • In Burkina Faso, you can obtain emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) at pharmacies, private clinics, family planning centers, and social marketing programs. You can get NorLevo 1.5 and Vikela, both of which are produced by French pharmaceutical companies, over-the-counter at pharmacies. No prescription is required. Meanwhile, if you go to a family planning clinic, you can directly access Optinor, an emergency contraceptive pill that is produced by WomanCare Global and distributed by a subsidiary of the International Planned Parenthood Federation. Finally, you can also find ellaOne in Burkina Faso, which is considered the most effective ECP, as of June 2018. However, a prescription is required for ellaOne.[12]
  • If you cannot access dedicated emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) in Burkina Faso, you can use regular birth control pills as replacement ECPs. To learn more about how to do this, you can visit the Princeton EC Website.
  • If you cannot access dedicated emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) in Burkina Faso, you can potentially get an IUD, which can prevent pregnancy for up to five days after unprotected sex. You should talk to a local health care professional about options.

CostsEdit

  • In January 2014, LNG emergency contraceptive pills cost around 3,625 CFA.[13]

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs)Edit

Important Notes - Learn about PEP and PrEP: If you think that you've been recently exposed to HIV (i.e. within 72 hours), seek out PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a month-long treatment to prevent HIV infection after exposure, and it may be available in your city. Take PEP as soon as possible. For more information, click here. If you are at risk of HIV exposure, seek out PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a daily oral pill that can prevent HIV infection before exposure. To learn more about PrEP, click here.

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

In Burkina Faso, there are no travel or residency restrictions related to HIV status. This means that, if you're a foreigner who is visiting Burkina Faso, you will not need to present a medical certificate related to your HIV status or reveal your HIV status in order to enter the country. Furthermore, if you plan to attain a work or residency visa in Burkina Faso, you will not be required to take an HIV test.[14]

As a country, Burkina Faso has made remarkable strides regarding HIV prevention and treatment in recent years. Between 2010 and 2016, the HIV infection rates decreased by 45% in Burkina Faso and AIDS-related deaths decreased by 13%. All health districts have programs to prevent mother-to-child prevention of HIV, and community health workers along with NGOs have provided critical HIV education to people in remote and rural communities. By 2016, it was estimated that about 0.8% of the adult population (ages 15-49) were living with HIV in 2016. However, the HIV infection rate was higher for women, with an estimated 1.1% living with HIV. The most impacted groups were sex workers (16.2% infection rate), men who have sex with men (3.6% infection rate) and prisoners (3% infection rate). [15] [16]

However, there is still room for improvement. The country has struggled to fully distribute antiretroviral drugs in the decentralized manner required by many Burkinabe people.[17]

Further Reading:

• Community health worker leads the way in Burkina Faso

Testing FacilitiesEdit

  • Association Burkinabè pour le Bien-Être Familial - ABBEF: Services include: "prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV and AIDS, provision of antiretroviral drugs, voluntary counselling and testing (VCT), screening for cancers of the reproductive system, post-abortion care, prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV and AIDS, and home-based care for people living with HIV and AIDS. "

SupportEdit

  • UNAIDS - Burkina Faso: Contact: Job SAGBOHAN, UNAIDS Country Director. Phone: +23276801402. Email: sagbohanj@unaids.org
  • Hope for AIDS - Burkina Faso: This organization provides education, HIV testing, and counseling, especially in more rural and remote parts of the country.
  • Secrétariat permanent du comité national de lutte contre le sida: 01 B.P. 7009, Ouagadougou 03. Phone +226 324 188 / 311 218. Contact person: Mrs. Tall
  • Centre d'information de conseil et de documentation sur le sida et la tuberculose (CICDoc) 01 B.P. 1788, Ouagadougou 01, Phone +226 369 690, Contact person: Dr. Niamba
  • AAS Association African Solidarité: 01 B.P. 2831, Ouagadougou 01, E-mail: aas@fasonet.bf, Phone +226 353 548

CostsEdit

Medications & VaccinesEdit

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

  • You can find the HPV vaccine available in Burkina Faso. There is a nationwide vaccination pilot program, as of 2017.[18]
  • While Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) is potentially available in Burkina Faso, it's rather rare. As of 2018, Gilead’s Truvada (TDF/FTC) is not approved for prevention.[19]

CostsEdit

MenstruationEdit

Note: In addition to pads and tampons, you can also use menstrual cups and menstrual underwear for your period. To learn more about menstrual cups, click here. To learn more about menstrual underwear, click here.

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

In Burkina Faso, menstruation is still a taboo topic for many women and girls. This is especially the case for rural girls, who may receive no information about menstruation before reaching puberty.[20] Once they begin menstruating, girls may find inadequate bathroom and sanitation facilities at their schools, so they miss school during their periods. In fact, 83% of girls in Burkina Faso have no place to change their menstrual products at schools.[21] However, there is interest among some NGOs and women's groups to improve the education, resources, and sense of empowerment among women in Burkina Faso.[22]

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

CostsEdit

Gynecological ExamsEdit

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

Services for Low-Income PeopleEdit

  • Association Burkinabè pour le Bien-Être Familial - ABBEF: They provide screening for cancers of the reproductive system. "Association Burkinabé pour le Bien-Etre Familial (FPABF) was set up in 1985. Staff and over 1,000 volunteers work to provide sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services to poor and marginalized people."
  • Marie Stopes International - Burkina Faso: This NGO focuses on providing free or low-cost health care services to women in need around the globe, including in Burkina Faso. "Our founding clinic offers a full range of reproductive health and family planning services. We lead the field in clinical quality standards and client focus, doubling as knowledge centres for the organisation’s outreach teams and government clinics. Our three outreach teams comprise a nurse, driver, assistant and doctor who travel to hard to reach parts of the country by boat and car, offering long acting and permanent (LAPM) contraceptive services to those who need them most." Address: MSI Burkina Faso, Blvd Tengsoba face à la gare routière, Patte d’Oie, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Telephone: +226 50 31 12 42/43, Fax: +226 50 31 12 46

Private Health Care Facilities & PhysiciansEdit

  • Pr. Bibiane Koné: Clinique Moussa Koné - 1200 Logements, Telephone: 25-36-14-79
  • Pr. Jean Lankouandé: Clinique Yentema, Telephone: 25-33-70-70
  • Dr. Charlemagne Ouédraogo: Clinique Moussa Koné, Telephone: 25-36-14-79
  • Dr. Salifou Traoré: Clinique Notre Dame de la Paix - Somgandé, Telephone: 25-35-61-53/55
  • Dr. Paul Stanislas Zoungrana: Clinique Les Genets - Ouaga 2000, Telephone: 25-37-43-80 / 78-88-38-88 / 70- 20-56-22

CostsEdit

PregnancyEdit

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

In Burkina Faso, women are legally entitled to 14 weeks of paid maternity leave, and they should be compensated by their employer and/or social security.[23] However, as many women in Burkina Faso may work in unofficial capacities, or they may be self-employed, or they may work in conditions that do not honor the laws, there is no guarantee that all women in Burkina Faso actually do receive this time off.

It is important to understand that women in Burkina Faso may deal with difficult or even deadly pregnancies. The maternal mortality rate is 317 deaths per 100,000 live births, which is the 31st highest maternal mortality rate in the world.[24] While the country has taken steps to reduce maternal mortality, the high rate is due to a number of factors, including women's low social status, lack of widely available and accessible education on sexual and reproductive health care, social and economic challenges faced by women, and the fact that women often have little control of how many children they have or when they have children.[25]

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

  • Association Burkinabè pour le Bien-Être Familial - ABBEF: They provide antenatal care, post-natal care, and prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV and AIDS. "Association Burkinabé pour le Bien-Etre Familial (FPABF) was set up in 1985. Staff and over 1,000 volunteers work to provide sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services to poor and marginalized people."
  • Marie Stopes International - Burkina Faso: This NGO focuses on providing free or low-cost health care services to women in need around the globe, including in Burkina Faso. "Our founding clinic offers a full range of reproductive health and family planning services. We lead the field in clinical quality standards and client focus, doubling as knowledge centres for the organisation’s outreach teams and government clinics. Our three outreach teams comprise a nurse, driver, assistant and doctor who travel to hard to reach parts of the country by boat and car, offering long acting and permanent (LAPM) contraceptive services to those who need them most." Address: MSI Burkina Faso, Blvd Tengsoba face à la gare routière, Patte d’Oie, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, Telephone: +226 50 31 12 42/43, Fax: +226 50 31 12 46

CostsEdit

AbortionEdit

Important Note: There are two main types of abortions: medical (also known as the "abortion pill") and surgical (also known as "in-clinic"). For medical abortions, you take a pill to induce abortion. For surgical abortions, a procedure is performed to induce abortion. For general information about medical and surgical abortions, click here.

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

In Burkina Faso, abortion is legally permitted in certain circumstances, which include: when the pregnancy endangers the life of the pregnant person, when the pregnancy endangers the physical or mental health of the pregnancy person, when the pregnancy is the result of rape or incest, or when there is severe risk of fetal impairment. It is not legally allowed for economic or social reasons, and it is not available upon request. [26]

Generally speaking, there is a low level of knowledge regarding abortion policy in Burkina Faso. According to a 2014 report, only one-third of Burkinabe women knew that abortion was legal in certain cases. The majority of abortions in Burkina Faso are conducted in a clandestine or underground capacity, and only about 3% of surveyed women legally obtained abortions in 2012. That same year, there were 105,000 abortions in Burkina Faso, and there was a national abortion rate of 25 pregnancy terminations for every 1,000 women (ages 15-49). The majority of women who have abortions in Burkina Faso tend to be younger (i.e. under 25 years old), unmarried and childless, better educated, and living in urban areas. There is also risk of abortion-related complications, especially for poorer and rural women.[27]

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

  • In Burkina Faso, abortion is legally permitted in certain cases, but it is not available upon request. The vast majority of women who receive abortions in Burkina Faso do so illegally through clandestine abortion providers. The quality of care will significantly vary, especially depending on someone's location and economic status.
  • According to Women on Waves, "Misoprostol is registered under the brand name Cytotec but it is difficult to get [in Burkina Faso]."[28]

CostsEdit

Advocacy & CounselingEdit

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

CostsEdit

List of Additional ResourcesEdit

  • Ministry of Health - Burkina Faso
  • Equaldex Burkina Faso: This website provides information related to LGBTQ rights and laws in Burkina Faso. As of 2018, homosexuality is legal in Burkina Faso, but homosexual marriage is not legally recognized. It is legal to have your gender changed, and you don't need to undergo surgery to have your gender change recognized by the government. The laws related to protection against discrimination (such as housing or employment discrimination) are ambiguous.
  • Association Burkinabè pour le Bien-Être Familial - ABBEF: "Association Burkinabé pour le Bien-Etre Familial (FPABF) was set up in 1985. Staff and over 1,000 volunteers work to provide sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services to poor and marginalized people."
  • Planned Parenthood Global - Burkina Faso: "In Burkina Faso, Planned Parenthood Global supports a diverse coalition of journalists, youth rights advocates, service delivery providers, legal experts, and religious and traditional leaders as part of the Voices For Health project."
  • UNFPA - Burkina Faso: The UNFPA says it "is the lead UN agency for delivering a world where every pregnancy is wanted, every childbirth is safe and every young person's potential is fulfilled."
  • Association Burkinabe Des Sages-Femmes: Address: 01 BP 4686 Ouagadougou - 01, Burkina Faso. Tel: (226) 30 72 59. Fax: (226) 30 72 59
  • Association des Femmes Burkinabe (AFB): Burkina Faso
  • Federation des Femmes Burkinabe: BP 1059 Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
  • Federation des Femmes Burkinabe: BP 1159, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
  • Groupe De Recherche D'etudes Et De Formation Femmesaction (GREFFA): 01 B.P 633, Ouagadougou 01, Burkina Faso. Tel: (226) 36 33 70. Fax: (226) 30 67 67
  • Promo-Femmes/Developpement Sport: R. Clementine Ouedraogo, 01 BP 2532, Avenue Houari Boumedienne, Ouagadougou 01, Burkina Faso. Tel: (226) 313052. Fax: (226) 313052.
  • Réseau de Communication, d'Information et de Formation des Femmes au Burkina Faso: "RECIF/ONG-BF is a non-governmental national organization, aiming at educating and informing women and stimulating their participation in decision-making processes in non-governmental organizations. This centre offers written and audiovisual material for consultation and lending. RECIF also produces radio and television programmes, addressing issues concerning the position of women. Language: French ." Address: RECIF/ONG-BF, 01 B.P. 6473 , Ouagadougou 01, Burkina Faso. Tel: +226 312 225 or (226) 30 64 77. Fax: +226 313 019. E-mail: recif@fasonet.bf
  • Reseau Sous-Regional Femmes Africaines Et Droits Humains (REFAD): Address: 01 B.P 633, Ouagadougou 01, Burkina Faso, Tel: (226) 36 33 70, Fax: (226) 30 67 67.
  • Secretariat d'Etat a l'Action Sociale: Objectives: To improve the socio-economic situation; To integrate women issues into the development process; To improve women activities. Address: B.P. 515, Ouagadougou 01, Burkina Faso. Tel: 306875. Telex Segegow 5555

ReferencesEdit

  1. COUNTRY PROFILE: FGM IN BURKINA FASO - December 2015
  2. Global Oral Contraception Availability
  3. Free the Pill: Where on Earth
  4. In West Africa, clinics confront suspicion, and husbands, one IUD at a time
  5. Unintended Pregnancy and Induced Abortion In Burkina Faso: Causes and Consequences
  6. CIA World Factbook - Burkina Faso
  7. Family Planning in Ghana, Burkina Faso, and Mali
  8. International Women's Health Program: Burkina Faso at a Glance
  9. BURKINA FASO: ELECTIONS CANNOT IGNORE WOMEN’S CRISIS
  10. Trends in Contraceptive Use Worldwide 2015
  11. EC Status and Availability: Burkina Faso
  12. EC Status and Availability: Burkina Faso
  13. EC Status and Availability: Burkina Faso
  14. BURKINA FASO - REGULATIONS ON ENTRY, STAY AND RESIDENCE FOR PLHIV
  15. UNAIDS: Burkina Faso
  16. Community health worker leads the way in Burkina Faso
  17. UNAIDS: Burkina Faso
  18. Human Papillomavirus and Related Diseases Report: BURKINA FASO
  19. PrEPWatch: Burkina Faso
  20. Boys and Girls Together: Menstrual Education for Global Gender Equity
  21. MENSTRUATION STILL HOLDS BACK WOMEN AND GIRLS
  22. What Is MHM and Why Should We Care?
  23. Burkina Faso – Employer of Record
  24. CIA World Factbook - Burkina Faso
  25. Burkina Faso struggles to reduce maternal mortality
  26. UN report: Burkina Faso Abortion Policy
  27. Abortion in Burkina Faso
  28. Women on Waves - Burkina Faso: Clinics and Organisations