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Difference between revisions of "Honduras"

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Latest revision as of 16:11, 18 August 2019

Flag of Honduras.svg.png

OVERVIEW

Contraception (Birth Control)[edit]

General Note: There are many types of contraceptives, also known as "birth control," including IUDs, oral contraceptives, patches, shots, and condoms, etc. If you would like to view a full list, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In Honduras, you can purchase condoms and birth control pills at pharmacies without a prescription, and no screening is required.[1] [2] However, for other forms of birth control, such as injectables and IUDs, you may need to directly visit a hospital or clinic to obtain them.

In 2015, it was estimated that about 73% of women in Honduras (who were married/in unions and between the ages of 15-49) were using any form of contraception, including traditional methods. This was roughly comparable to the Central American average (about 71% of women). Furthermore, it was estimated that about 11% of women had unmet family planning needs, which was equal to the Central American average (11% of women). The most common forms of contraception were female sterilization (22% of women), contraceptive injectables (18% of women), and contraceptive pills (12% of women). Other forms of contraception were IUDs (7% of women) and condoms (4% of women). Traditional methods were also used by some women, including withdrawal (6% of women) and the rhythm method (3% of women). There were practically no recorded users of vaginal barrier methods or contraceptive implants.[3]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • For oral contraceptives (birth control pills), the easiest option is to visit a pharmacy.[4] The pills are sold over-the-counter.
  • Some forms of contraception, such as IUDs, may require that you visit a hospital or clinic. There are public or private options.
  • The Honduran Associacion for Family Planning (ASHONPLAFA): They're a local affiliate of the International Planned Parenthood Association, and they're one of the main suppliers of contraceptives to people in Honduras. You can find 24-hour service at the Alameda clinics in Tegucigalpa, Santa Rosa de Copán, Swiss Hospital in La Ceiba and at their Firenze clinic in San Pedro Sula, though their pharmacies may not be open 24 hours. You can contact a local clinic for details or visit them directly. Address: Ashonplafa Main Office Telephone: (504) 2232-3959, 2239-9695; Fax. 2232-5140 Address: Col. Alameda, Avenida principal, Tegucigalpa, MDC, Honduras; Email: Central@ashonplafa.org
  • The Secretary of Health system of hospitals, CESaMOs (Secretary of Health clinics with doctors and dentists), and CESARs (rural health clinics staffed by nurses) dispense contraceptives to many people in Honduras.[4]

Costs[edit]

  • When we talked to one private clinic (Dra. Amabilis Fuentes (Call +504 9957-5468), we were quoted the following price for an IUD: 1000lps (July 2019)

Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)[edit]

Important Notes: Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC as soon as possible after unprotected sex to prevent pregnancy. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click here and here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In Honduras, emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) have been banned since 2009. The Supreme Court upheld this ban in 2012.[5] [6] However, in 2019, Honduras activists launched a campaign to legalize emergency contraception. This organizational effort goes under the name Habelmos Lo Que Es (translated to "Let's talk about what it is"). One of the organizations involved in the campaign is Grupo Estratégico por la PAE (GEPAE).[7] The emergency contraceptive pill remains illegal, as of 2019, but the work of activists may change this in the future.

In Honduras, Catholic clergy and government ministers have falsely claimed that emergency contraception is "the abortion pill." This has lead to widespread misconceptions about emergency contraception in the country.[8] In the past, it was estimated that about 53% of Honduran women (of reproductive age) had knowledge of emergency contraceptive options, as of 2011-2012, and about 1% of Honduran women (of reproductive age) had ever used emergency contraceptive pills, as of 2005-2006.[9]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • Hablemos Lo Que Es: This organization provides educational resources on emergency contraception, and they advocate for its legalization in Honduras.

Costs[edit]

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs)[edit]

Important Notes - Learn about PEP and PrEP: If you think that you've been recently exposed to HIV (i.e. within 72 hours), seek out PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a month-long treatment to prevent HIV infection after exposure, and it may be available in your city. Take PEP as soon as possible. For more information, click here. If you are at risk of HIV exposure, seek out PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a daily oral pill that can prevent HIV infection before exposure. To learn more about PrEP, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In Honduras, there are no known travel restrictions for people with HIV/AIDS. This means that, if you're a foreigner, you can enter the country, regardless of your HIV status, and visit for a short-term trip. However, if you're a foreigner who wants to get a residence card or work permit, you'll need to take a test and prove that your HIV-negative.[10] [11]

In 2017, it was estimated that about 22,000 adults and children were living with HIV in Honduras. In total, about 0.3% of adults living in Honduras are living with HIV, according to estimates, and about 52% of people living with HIV are on ART (i.e. treatment). Generally, women tend to receive HIV treatment at higher rates than men, with about 65% of women on ART and 43% of men on ART. The higher rate for women may due to the additional medical care that women receive as mothers, since 65% of children with HIV are also on ART. It is estimated that about 53% of pregnant women receive ART for Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV (PMTCT).[12]

Testing Facilities[edit]

Support[edit]

  • Note: You can find HIV treatment at public hospitals and clinics in Honduras. There are a total of 37 Centers of Integral Assistance (Centros de Asistencia Integral, or CAI), which provide treatment. However, this treatment is often limited and may not cover all of your needs. The CAIs in Tegucigalpa are considered the best in the country.[13]
  • One of the big issues for many Hondurans is that HIV treatment facilities may be far from their homes, particularly if they live in rural areas, or the treatment centers in their areas may be understaffed or lacking in resources.[13]
  • UNAIDS Honduras
  • World Health Organization (WHO) - Information on HIV/AIDS in Honduras
  • Siempre Unidos: They provide HIV testing, treatment, social support, education, and advocacy. The organization is affiliated with the Episcopal Diocese of Honduras and partnered with the Honduran Ministry of Health. Email: info@siempreunidos.org
  • Project Hope: They do work to help people struggling with disasters and health crises, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, diabetes, and other infections and diseases.
  • UNFPA Report: Voices of Women Living with HIV/AIDS in Honduras

Costs[edit]

Medications & Vaccines[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

Costs[edit]

Menstruation[edit]

Note: In addition to pads and tampons, you can also use menstrual cups and menstrual underwear for your period. To learn more about menstrual cups, click here. To learn more about menstrual underwear, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

Costs[edit]

Gynecological Exams[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • Clinica Mater Dei: This clinic, which calls itself a "comprehensive women's center," was recommended by a local. They have a range of services, and you can expect to pay around 1200 Lempira for an appointment, according to one local in 2019. Location: Colonia Tepeyac, Calle Yoro contiguo a RadioHouse, Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Phone: 2239-4809. Email: info@materdeihn.com

Costs[edit]

  • When we talked to one private clinic (Dra. Amabilis Fuentes (Call +504 9957-5468), we were quoted the following price for a consultation, including a gynecological exam: 700 lps (July 2019)

Pregnancy[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • Dr. George Frazer at Hospital San Jorge El Hato: This ob/gyn was strongly recommended by a local.
  • Honduras Hospital: Phone: (504) 2280-1500; Address: Col. Las Minitas, Avenida Juan Lindo, Tegucigalpa; Email: sac@hmc.hn

Costs[edit]

Abortion[edit]

Important Note: There are two main types of abortions: medical (also known as the "abortion pill") and surgical (also known as "in-clinic"). For medical abortions, you take a pill to induce abortion. For surgical abortions, a procedure is performed to induce abortion. For general information about medical and surgical abortions, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In Honduras, abortion is prohibited without exception.[14] However, this does not mean that women in Honduras do not receive abortions. In fact, it's estimated that there are about 50,000 to 80,000 clandestine abortions in Honduras per year, as of 2019. There is a large clandestine abortion network in Honduras, and it is reportedly common for people to procure medical abortion pills through underground networks. There is also an abortion hotline ("La Linea", or "the line" in English), which provides information on abortion services, and people can call this hotline anonymously.

One warning about hotlines: There are anti-abortion hotlines that try to trick people into thinking they are calling pro-choice hotlines (which often advertise services in newspapers).

It is important to understand that women die every year in Honduras due to complications from abortion procedures. The underground network of providers does have the regulations of legal networks, so women sometimes have abortions in unsafe conditions.[15]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • La Linea (the Line): Call: #9439-6384. "The Line offers confidential, free, safe and scientific information on safe abortion and emergency contraception in Honduras. They are the only line of attention offering this information in Honduras, where there is a critical need for this type of support for women's rights and sexual and reproductive health rights."

Costs[edit]

Advocacy & Counseling[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • Police: Call 199
  • Emergencies: Call 237-1400
  • Red Cross in Tegucigalpa (good for medical situations): Call 195 or 227-7575
  • Yo No Quiero Ser Violada (I Don't Want to Be Raped): This group advocates for awareness of sexual violence, and they are calling for national guidelines for victims and survivors of sexual assault.

Costs[edit]

List of Additional Resources[edit]

  • Ministry of Health
  • The Honduran Associacion for Family Planning (ASHONPLAFA): "One of the most esteemed actors in the field of sexual and reproductive rights in Honduras, Ashonplafa provides integrated sexual and reproductive health services through clinics located in nearly every state of the country, including specialized services and educational initiatives attuned to the specific needs of young people. In a country where 66% of the population lives in poverty, Ashonplafa offers subsidized services scaled to the client’s ability to pay, and operates mobile health units that reach people living in rural areas. "
  • Honduras Family Planning 2020
  • Centro de Derechos de Mujeres: "The CDM is a Honduran organization, feminist, autonomous, critical, proactive, that fights for the human rights of women." Address: Colonia Lara Norte, Manuel José Arce Ave., Calle Lara N. 834, Tegucigalpa, Honduras, PO Box 4562. Tel / Fax: (504) 2221-0459 / (504) 2221-0657. E-mail: cdm@cablecolor.hn
  • Equaldex - Honduras: Click here to learn about LGBTQ rights and laws in Honduras.
  • Honduran Equality Delegation: They focus on LGBTQ rights issues in Honduras.
  • Lonely Planet - Info for LGBT Travelers in Honduras

References[edit]

  1. Global Oral Contraception Availability
  2. Free the Pill: Where on Earth?
  3. Trends in Contraceptive Use Worldwide 2015
  4. 4.0 4.1 Contraceptive Discontinuation among Honduran Women Who Use Reversible Methods
  5. EC Status and Availability - Honduras
  6. In Case You’ve Forgotten: Emergency Contraception In Honduras
  7. 10 Years After Ban, Honduran Activists Launch Campaign to Legalize Morning-After Pill
  8. Honduras urged to put an end to birth control myths
  9. EC Status and Availability - Honduras
  10. HONDURAS - REGULATIONS ON ENTRY, STAY AND RESIDENCE FOR PLHIV
  11. Requirements For Retiree Residency In Honduras
  12. UNAIDS, HIV and AIDS Estimates (Honduras)
  13. 13.0 13.1 Filling the Gaps in HIV Care within the Honduran Healthcare System
  14. Abortion in Latin America and the Caribbean
  15. The informal networks resisting Honduras’s abortion ban