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'''OVERVIEW'''  
 
'''OVERVIEW'''  
  
Rwanda is a country that has shown remarkable progress related to sexual and reproductive health care in the past few decades. You can legally obtain oral contraceptives (birth control pills) without a prescription, and condoms are widely sold in pharmacies, kiosks, bars and markets. Other contraceptive methods, such as IUDs and injectables, are also available. Furthermore, you can obtain the emergency contraceptive pill (morning after pill) without a prescription. The country provides universal health care coverage for HIV patients, and aggressive efforts have been made to reduce HIV transmission from parent to child in the country. While we're not sure if PrEP is available in Rwanda, PEP should be available. Menstrual hygiene is a challenging issue in Rwanda, where many women have inadequate access to menstrual products and may miss school during their periods. We have provided more information on this topic in the "Menstruation" section. Regarding pregnancy, women are entitled to 12 weeks of maternity leave with full pay, though this right may not translate to all workers and all work environments. Finally, abortion is permitted in some cases, which are detailed in the "Abortion" section. Overall, Rwanda, like all countries, experiences challenges and hurdles related to women's health care. However, it has also demonstrated focused and effective strategies to rebuild its health care infrastructure and tackle immediate issues of concern, such as HIV transmission from mother to child.
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==Contraception (Birth Control)==
 
==Contraception (Birth Control)==
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Contraceptive Use Worldwide 2015]</ref>
 
Contraceptive Use Worldwide 2015]</ref>
  
Despite notable progress, there is room for improvement related to contraceptive accessibility and education. In Rwandan schools, there exists no comprehensive sex-education,<ref>[http://www.newtimes.co.rw/section/read/65697/ Sex education remains unspoken in secondary schools]</ref> though efforts have been made to improve teacher training in sex-education by UNFPA, as of 2016.<ref>[http://rwanda.unfpa.org/en/news/new-curriculum-promote-sex-education-schools New curriculum to promote sex education in schools]</ref> Furthermore, nearly half of all pregnancies (47%) in Rwanda are unintended, as of 2013.<ref>[https://www.guttmacher.org/fact-sheet/abortion-rwanda Guttmacher Institute: Abortion in Rwanda, April 2013]</ref> There are significant issues related to sexual trauma, sexual violence and bodily autonomy experienced by many Rwandans, following the Rwandan Civil War and Rwandan Genocide, as well. To speak broadly, sexual and reproductive health care options have expanded since 2000, yet education, accessibility and sensitivity are still major issues that the country continues to grapple with.
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Despite notable progress, there is room for improvement related to contraceptive accessibility and education. In Rwandan schools, there exists no comprehensive sex-education,<ref>[http://www.newtimes.co.rw/section/read/65697/ Sex education remains unspoken in secondary schools]</ref> though efforts have been made to improve teacher training in sex-education by UNFPA, as of 2016.<ref>[http://rwanda.unfpa.org/en/news/new-curriculum-promote-sex-education-schools New curriculum to promote sex education in schools]</ref> Furthermore, nearly half of all pregnancies (47%) in Rwanda are unintended, as of 2013.<ref>[https://www.guttmacher.org/fact-sheet/abortion-rwanda Guttmacher Institute: Abortion in Rwanda, April 2013]</ref> There are significant issues related to sexual trauma, sexual violence and bodily autonomy experienced by many Rwandans, following the Rwandan Civil War (1990-1994), as well. To speak broadly, sexual and reproductive health care options have expanded since 2000, yet education, accessibility and sensitivity are still major issues that the country continues to grapple with.
  
 
According to a Kigali local: "The stigma of birth control has diminished as the country develops, and especially as a lot more young Rwandans return home after doing their studies abroad. It's a lot more common now to openly admit that you are on the pill, for example. However, there is a huge difference in class here. Middle-class or Rwandans (or those that have returned recently from US, Europe, or Canada) are totally fine going on birth control. Among the majority of the population (still living in relative poverty), pre-marital sex is still frowned upon, and as a result, contraceptives are viewed as promiscuous. Condoms are promoted (moth male and female), but for 'good, God-fearing' people, it is not good to be seen with a condom on you, as this seen as a signal that you are sleeping around." (March 2018)
 
According to a Kigali local: "The stigma of birth control has diminished as the country develops, and especially as a lot more young Rwandans return home after doing their studies abroad. It's a lot more common now to openly admit that you are on the pill, for example. However, there is a huge difference in class here. Middle-class or Rwandans (or those that have returned recently from US, Europe, or Canada) are totally fine going on birth control. Among the majority of the population (still living in relative poverty), pre-marital sex is still frowned upon, and as a result, contraceptives are viewed as promiscuous. Condoms are promoted (moth male and female), but for 'good, God-fearing' people, it is not good to be seen with a condom on you, as this seen as a signal that you are sleeping around." (March 2018)

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