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Last modified on 26 April 2019, at 13:52

Nukuʻalofa

Tonga / Nukuʻalofa
Nukualofa centre.jpg

OVERVIEW

Contraception (Birth Control)Edit

General Note: There are many types of contraceptives, also known as "birth control," including IUDs, oral contraceptives, patches, shots, and condoms, etc. If you would like to view a full list, click here.

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

In 2015, it was estimated that about 35% of Tongan women (who were married/in unions and between the ages of 15-49) were using any form of contraception, including traditional methods. This was slightly lower than the Polynesian average (about 39% of women). Furthermore, it was estimated that about 28% had unmet family planning needs, which was higher than the Polynesian average (24% of women). However, it should be understood that modern contraceptive methods are not very popular, on average, with about 30% of women using modern methods. The most common forms of contraception were female sterilization (15% of women), contraceptive injectables (7% of women), and IUDs (4% of women). There were low rates of usage for oral contraceptives/birth control (2% of women) and condoms (less than 2% of women). There were practically no users of contraceptive implants (0%) or vaginal barrier methods. Women also used traditional contraceptive methods, such as the rhythm method (about 3% of women) and withdrawal, also known as the pull-out method (2% of women).[1]

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

  • "There is a blue drug store on the main road in Vavau that is run by New Zealanders and would most likely carry it." - Pink Pangea[2]

CostsEdit

Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)Edit

Important Notes: Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC as soon as possible after unprotected sex. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click here and here.

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

In December 2013, emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) was not officially registered in Tonga, but they were imported into the country.[3] However, we'll need to update this page with more current info (please edit this page if you have recent info).

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

CostsEdit

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs)Edit

Important Notes - Learn about PEP and PrEP: If you think that you've been recently exposed to HIV (i.e. within 72 hours), seek out PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a month-long treatment to prevent HIV infection after exposure, and it may be available in your city. Take PEP as soon as possible. For more information, click here. If you are at risk of HIV exposure, seek out PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a daily oral pill that can prevent HIV infection before exposure. To learn more about PrEP, click here.

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

Testing FacilitiesEdit

  • You can find HIV testing services, including HIV counseling and treatment, in many hospitals and the Tongan Family Health Association clinic.[4]

SupportEdit

CostsEdit

Medications & VaccinesEdit

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

CostsEdit

MenstruationEdit

Note: In addition to pads and tampons, you can also use menstrual cups and menstrual underwear for your period. To learn more about menstrual cups, click here. To learn more about menstrual underwear, click here.

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

CostsEdit

Gynecological ExamsEdit

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

CostsEdit

PregnancyEdit

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

CostsEdit

AbortionEdit

Important Note: There are two main types of abortions: medical (also known as the "abortion pill") and surgical (also known as "in-clinic"). For medical abortions, you take a pill to induce abortion. For surgical abortions, a procedure is performed to induce abortion. For general information about medical and surgical abortions, click here.

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

CostsEdit

Advocacy & CounselingEdit

Laws & Social StigmasEdit

What to Get & Where to Get ItEdit

CostsEdit

List of Additional ResourcesEdit

  • Ministry of Health
  • The Tonga Family Health Association (TFHA): "Within Tonga's well-developed healthcare system and infrastructure, reproductive health (RH) services are made up of a well-defined clinical / curative component and a public health / preventative component. The government of Tonga acknowledges the crucial role played by the Tonga Family Health Association (TFHA) in the Reproductive Health Programme for the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), in particular the health-related MDGs 4, 5 and 6."
  • Tonga Leitis Association: "The Tonga Leitis Association (TLA) was established in 1992 with a focus on improving the rights and celebrating the contribution of Leitis in Tonga. As the HIV epidemic developed globally, and the vulnerability of men who have sex with men (MSM) and Transgender (TG) to HIV became clear, TLA became and continues to be a major part of the HIV Response in Tonga. TLA is committed to growth and continuing to make a significant difference in the lives of people with diverse sexual orientations, gender identities and expressions."
  • Equaldex - Tonga: Click here to learn about LGBTQ rights and laws in Togo. It is important to understand that male homosexuality is illegal in Tonga and the laws around female homosexuality are ambiguous.

ReferencesEdit

  1. Trends in Contraceptive Use Worldwide 2015
  2. Basic Facts – Tonga
  3. Emergency Contraceptive Pill Registration Status by Country
  4. KINGDOM OF TONGA - Sexual and Reproductive Health Rights Needs Assessment