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Difference between revisions of "Tegucigalpa"

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(Laws & Social Stigmas)
(Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill))
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==Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)==
 
==Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)==
  
'''Important Notes:''' Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC '''as soon as possible''' after unprotected sex. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click [https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/morning-after-pill-emergency-contraception here] and [http://ec.princeton.edu/info/ecp.html here].
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'''Important Notes:''' Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC '''as soon as possible''' after unprotected sex to prevent pregnancy. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click [https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/morning-after-pill-emergency-contraception here] and [http://ec.princeton.edu/info/ecp.html here].
  
 
===Laws & Social Stigmas===
 
===Laws & Social Stigmas===
  
===What to Get & Where to Get It===
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In Honduras, emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) have been banned since 2009. The Supreme Court upheld this ban in 2012.<ref>[https://www.cecinfo.org/country-by-country-information/status-availability-database/countries/honduras/ EC Status and Availability - Honduras]</ref> <ref>[https://hondurasreport.org/2017/06/01/emergency-contraception-in-honduras/ In Case You’ve Forgotten: Emergency Contraception In Honduras]</ref>
  
'''Note:''' The longest-lasting EC is currently [http://www.ellaone.com/ ellaOne]. It lasts up to 5 days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Check to see if your country carries ellaOne. If your country doesn't carry ellaOne, copper IUDs may also prevent pregnancy up to 5 days after unprotected sex. If none of these options are available, and it's been over 3 days since you had unprotected sex, you can still take EC, which may work up to 5 days. Note that EC pills are not 100% effective and should be taken as soon as possible.
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In the past, it was estimated that about 53% of Honduran women (of reproductive age) have knowledge of emergency contraceptive options, as of 2011-2012, and  of 1% of Honduran women (of reproductive age) have ever used emergency contraceptive pills have ever used emergency contraceptive pills, as of 2005-2006.<ref>[https://www.cecinfo.org/country-by-country-information/status-availability-database/countries/honduras/ EC Status and Availability - Honduras]</ref>
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===What to Get & Where to Get It===
  
 
===Costs===
 
===Costs===

Revision as of 10:31, 18 December 2018

Honduras / Honduran Highlands / Tegucigalpa

OVERVIEW

Contraception (Birth Control)

General Note: There are many types of contraceptives, also known as "birth control," including IUDs, oral contraceptives, patches, shots, and condoms, etc. If you would like to view a full list, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas

In Honduras, you can purchase condoms and birth control pills at pharmacies without a prescription, and no screening is required.[1] [2] However, for other forms of birth control, such as implants, injectables, and IUDs, you may need to directly visit a hospital or clinic to obtain them.

What to Get & Where to Get It

Costs

Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)

Important Notes: Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC as soon as possible after unprotected sex to prevent pregnancy. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click here and here.

Laws & Social Stigmas

In Honduras, emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) have been banned since 2009. The Supreme Court upheld this ban in 2012.[3] [4]

In the past, it was estimated that about 53% of Honduran women (of reproductive age) have knowledge of emergency contraceptive options, as of 2011-2012, and of 1% of Honduran women (of reproductive age) have ever used emergency contraceptive pills have ever used emergency contraceptive pills, as of 2005-2006.[5]

What to Get & Where to Get It

Costs

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs)

Important Notes - Learn about PEP and PrEP: If you think that you've been recently exposed to HIV (i.e. within 72 hours), seek out PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a month-long treatment to prevent HIV infection after exposure, and it may be available in your city. Take PEP as soon as possible. For more information, click here. If you are at risk of HIV exposure, seek out PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a daily oral pill that can prevent HIV infection before exposure. To learn more about PrEP, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas

What to Get & Where to Get It

Testing Facilities

Support

Costs

Medications & Vaccines

Laws & Social Stigmas

What to Get & Where to Get It

Costs

Menstruation

Note: In addition to pads and tampons, you can also use menstrual cups and menstrual underwear for your period. To learn more about menstrual cups, click here. To learn more about menstrual underwear, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas

What to Get & Where to Get It

Costs

Gynecological Exams

Laws & Social Stigmas

What to Get & Where to Get It

Costs

Pregnancy

Laws & Social Stigmas

What to Get & Where to Get It

Costs

Abortion

Important Note: There are two main types of abortions: medical (also known as the "abortion pill") and surgical (also known as "in-clinic"). For medical abortions, you take a pill to induce abortion. For surgical abortions, a procedure is performed to induce abortion. For general information about medical and surgical abortions, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas

What to Get & Where to Get It

Costs

Advocacy & Counseling

Laws & Social Stigmas

What to Get & Where to Get It

Costs

List of Additional Resources

References

  1. Global Oral Contraception Availability
  2. Free the Pill: Where on Earth?
  3. EC Status and Availability - Honduras
  4. In Case You’ve Forgotten: Emergency Contraception In Honduras
  5. EC Status and Availability - Honduras