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Difference between revisions of "Kinshasa"

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There are known travel restrictions related to HIV/AIDS. This means that, if you travel to the DRC, you will not be asked for a medical certificate or proof of your HIV status.<ref>[http://www.hivtravel.org/Default.aspx?PageId=143&CountryId=52 CONGO (KINSHASA) - REGULATIONS ON ENTRY, STAY AND RESIDENCE FOR PLHIV]</ref>
 
There are known travel restrictions related to HIV/AIDS. This means that, if you travel to the DRC, you will not be asked for a medical certificate or proof of your HIV status.<ref>[http://www.hivtravel.org/Default.aspx?PageId=143&CountryId=52 CONGO (KINSHASA) - REGULATIONS ON ENTRY, STAY AND RESIDENCE FOR PLHIV]</ref>
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Generally speaking, the DRC has a lower rate of HIV infection than many other African countries, and the country has made progress in reducing the infection rate. In 2018, it was estimated that about 45,000 people, which is less than 1% of the adult population, in the DRC were living with HIV. Between 2010-20, the HIV infection rate dropped from about 31,000/year (in 2010) to 19,000/year (in 2020). Furthermore, there was a 60% drop in the number of AIDS-related deaths, going from about 34,000 deaths/year (in 2010 to about 13,000 deaths/year (2020). In 2018, it was estimated that about 62% of people with HIV in the DRC knew their status, and about 57% of HIV people were on treatment. However, it is important to understand that women are especially at risk for HIV infection in the DRC. The HIV infection rates among young women (ages 15-24) are about 4 times those of young men.<ref name=undaids_drc>[https://www.unaids.org/en/regionscountries/countries/democraticrepublicofthecongo UNAIDS: Democratic Republic of the Congo]</ref>
  
 
===Testing Facilities===
 
===Testing Facilities===

Revision as of 20:46, 21 March 2020

Boulevard du 30 juin, Kinshasa.jpg

OVERVIEW

Generally speaking, the DRC is a diverse country with over 200 ethnic groups. The majority of the people are Bantu, and French is the official language. In terms of religion, 30% of the country is Roman Catholic and 27% are Protestant. Many of the people in the DRC live in poverty, despite the rich natural resources of the country. There is a large refugee population, including DRC citizens who have been internally displaced and refugees from other countries, such as Rwanda, the Central African Republic, and Burundi. The majority of the population is young, with about 46% between 0-14 years old, 20% between 15-24 years old, and 28% between 25-54 years old. Less than 10% of the population is over 55 years old, as of 2020.[1]

Contraception (Birth Control)

General Note: There are many types of contraceptives, also known as "birth control," including IUDs, oral contraceptives, patches, shots, and condoms, etc. If you would like to view a full list, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas

Generally speaking, contraceptives are used by some women in the DRC, but many do not use them. The country has the second lowest modern contraceptive usage rate in sub-Saharan Africa (about 8% of women of reproductive age) and the second highest fertility rate (6.6 children per women), according to a 2017 report.[2]

In 2015, it was estimated that about 23% of women in the DRC (who were married/in unions and between the ages of 15-49) were using any form of contraception, including traditional methods. This was comparable to the Central African average (about 23% of women). Furthermore, it was estimated that about 27% had unmet family planning needs, which was slightly higher than the Central African average (26% of women). However, it should be understood that modern contraceptive methods are not very popular, with only 9% of women using modern methods, on average.

The most common forms of contraception were the rhythm method (about 8% of women), withdrawal (5% of women), and condoms (4% of women). Other methods were not commonly used, such as injectables (about 1% of women), implants (less than 1% of women), female sterilization (less than 1% of women), pills (less than 1% of women), and the vaginal barrier method (less than 1% of women).[3]

For many women in the DRC, the biggest hurdle regarding contraceptive use isn't access. Many women, including in rural areas, have access to clinics, which provide information and services. However, there are religious, social, and economic reasons why women may not opt for modern contraceptives. About half the population is Roman Catholic (50%).[4] The Catholic Church promotes large families and opposes modern contraceptives. For this reason, women typically rely on natural and traditional methods, such as the rhythm method. Furthermore, it has been reported that some women opt to forego contraception and have larger families, as they worry that not all of their children will survive, due to the ongoing conflict in the country.[5] Finally, traditional values often rank women with many children as possessing higher social and economic standing.[2]

What to Get & Where to Get It

  • Marie Stopes - The Democratic Republic of Congo: "Marie Stopes DRC has begun its mission to expand access to quality family planning for Congolese women in the capital Kinshasa and the neighbouring province of Tshopo, with the aim to expand to further provinces as the programme grows. Services are initially focused on mobile outreach, with teams of midwives and nurses travelling by road and river to bring contraception to women in remote areas and urban slums. The programme also provides services through a network of MS Ladies, trained healthcare providers (usually nurses, midwives or community health workers) who work within the local community to increase access to high quality family planning services and advice." Address: Marie Stopes DRC, Consession Safricas, Rue Sergent Moke n° 14, Quartier, Socimat, Commune Ngaliema,, Kinshasa. Phone: +243 82 899 72 25
  • DKT International - The Democratic Republic of Congo: They distribute condoms and other forms of contraception, train health care providers, and conduct outreach in clinics. Call +243 971 014 205. Email: info@dkt-rdc.org.

Costs

Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)

Important Notes: Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC as soon as possible after unprotected sex. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click here and here.

Laws & Social Stigmas

Emergency contraceptive pills (also known as morning after pills) are available in the DRC. The law states that they are available by prescription only,[6] but it appears that it can be purchased without a prescription (based on testimony in reports).[2]

What to Get & Where to Get It

  • Emergency contraceptive pills (also known as morning after pills) can be purchased at pharmacies, health centers, and hospitals.

Costs

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs)

Important Notes - Learn about PEP and PrEP: If you think that you've been recently exposed to HIV (i.e. within 72 hours), seek out PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a month-long treatment to prevent HIV infection after exposure, and it may be available in your city. Take PEP as soon as possible. For more information, click here. If you are at risk of HIV exposure, seek out PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a daily oral pill that can prevent HIV infection before exposure. To learn more about PrEP, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas

There are known travel restrictions related to HIV/AIDS. This means that, if you travel to the DRC, you will not be asked for a medical certificate or proof of your HIV status.[7]

Generally speaking, the DRC has a lower rate of HIV infection than many other African countries, and the country has made progress in reducing the infection rate. In 2018, it was estimated that about 45,000 people, which is less than 1% of the adult population, in the DRC were living with HIV. Between 2010-20, the HIV infection rate dropped from about 31,000/year (in 2010) to 19,000/year (in 2020). Furthermore, there was a 60% drop in the number of AIDS-related deaths, going from about 34,000 deaths/year (in 2010 to about 13,000 deaths/year (2020). In 2018, it was estimated that about 62% of people with HIV in the DRC knew their status, and about 57% of HIV people were on treatment. However, it is important to understand that women are especially at risk for HIV infection in the DRC. The HIV infection rates among young women (ages 15-24) are about 4 times those of young men.[8]

Testing Facilities

Support

Costs

Medications & Vaccines

Laws & Social Stigmas

What to Get & Where to Get It

Costs

Menstruation

Note: In addition to pads and tampons, you can also use menstrual cups and menstrual underwear for your period. To learn more about menstrual cups, click here. To learn more about menstrual underwear, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas

What to Get & Where to Get It

Costs

Gynecological Exams

Laws & Social Stigmas

What to Get & Where to Get It

Costs

Pregnancy

Laws & Social Stigmas

The maternal mortality rate (MMR) is 693 deaths per 100,000 live births, according to 2015 data. This MMR is ranked 10th in the world, meaning that the DRC has the 10th worst MMR globally. [9]

What to Get & Where to Get It

Costs

Abortion

Important Note: There are two main types of abortions: medical (also known as the "abortion pill") and surgical (also known as "in-clinic"). For medical abortions, you take a pill to induce abortion. For surgical abortions, a procedure is performed to induce abortion. For general information about medical and surgical abortions, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas

What to Get & Where to Get It

Costs

Advocacy & Counseling

Laws & Social Stigmas

What to Get & Where to Get It

Costs

List of Additional Resources

References