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Niamey

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Revision as of 16:56, 12 May 2019 by Lani314 (talk | contribs) (→‎Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs))
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OVERVIEW

Contraception (Birth Control)[edit | edit source]

General Note: There are many types of contraceptives, also known as "birth control," including IUDs, oral contraceptives, patches, shots, and condoms, etc. If you would like to view a full list, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

In 2015, it was estimated that about 15% of women in Niger (who were married/in unions and between the ages of 15-49) were using any form of contraception, including traditional methods. This was lower than the Western African average (about 17% of women). Furthermore, it was estimated that about 18% had unmet family planning needs, which was lower than the Western African average ( 24% of women). It should be understood that modern contraceptive methods are not very popular, with only 10% of women using modern methods. The most common forms of contraception were oral contraceptives/birth control pills (about 7% of women), various traditional methods (about 6% of women), and injectables about 3% of women). All other methods were used by less than 1% of women, which included contraceptive injectables (less than 1% of women) and IUDs (less than 1% of women).[1]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

  • Marie Stopes Niger: "At the request of the Nigerian Ministry of Health, we began assessment visits to Niger in 2013. From July 2014 we began delivering contraceptive services through mobile outreach teams and four Marie Stopes Ladies, allowing us to reach rural communities surrounding the city of Niamey. Our first centre opened for services in July 2016 in Niamey, and we are looking to increase the capacity of Marie Stopes Niger to drive the success of our centre." Address: Marie Stopes Niger, Quartier Plateau, Boulevard Mali Bero, Rue Issa Berie, IB65-Niamey, BP 12312, Niger; Phone: +227 91 72 08 83.

Costs[edit | edit source]

Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)[edit | edit source]

Important Notes: Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC as soon as possible after unprotected sex to prevent pregnancy. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click here and here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

In Niger, emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) are available over-the-counter at pharmacies. No prescription is required.[2] For more information, check out this report: Counting What Counts: Tracking Access to Emergency Contraception in Niger (2014)

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

  • You can find emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) at pharmacies, and they are sold over-the-counter. Some brands you may find are NorLevo 1.5mg, Optinor, Pregnon, and ellaOne.[3]
  • Note: The longest-lasting EC is currently ellaOne. It lasts up to 5 days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Check to see if your country carries ellaOne. If your country doesn't carry ellaOne, copper IUDs may also prevent pregnancy up to 5 days after unprotected sex. If none of these options are available, and it's been over 3 days since you had unprotected sex, you can still take EC, which may work up to 5 days. Note that EC pills are not 100% effective and should be taken as soon as possible.

Costs[edit | edit source]

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs)[edit | edit source]

Important Notes - Learn about PEP and PrEP: If you think that you've been recently exposed to HIV (i.e. within 72 hours), seek out PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a month-long treatment to prevent HIV infection after exposure, and it may be available in your city. Take PEP as soon as possible. For more information, click here. If you are at risk of HIV exposure, seek out PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a daily oral pill that can prevent HIV infection before exposure. To learn more about PrEP, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

In 2017, it was estimated that around 36,000 people (adults and children) were living with HIV/AIDS in Niger. In total, about 0.3% of the adult population was living with HIV/AIDS. In terms of treatment, about 52% of adults living with HIV were on ART, while about 40% of pregnant women received ART to prevent pregnant mother to child transmission (PCMT).[4]

Generally speaking, HIV appears to be highly stigmatized in Niger. According to one survey, over 70% of adults stated that they would not buy vegetables from someone who they knew had HIV. Meanwhile, only a little over 20% of young people (ages 15-24) know about HIV prevention.[4]

Testing Facilities[edit | edit source]

Support[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Medications & Vaccines[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Menstruation[edit | edit source]

Note: In addition to pads and tampons, you can also use menstrual cups and menstrual underwear for your period. To learn more about menstrual cups, click here. To learn more about menstrual underwear, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Gynecological Exams[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Pregnancy[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

The maternal mortality rate (MMR) is 553 deaths per 100,000 live births, according to 2015 data. This MMR is ranked 17th in the world, meaning that Niger has a significant MMR problem. [5]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Abortion[edit | edit source]

Important Note: There are two main types of abortions: medical (also known as the "abortion pill") and surgical (also known as "in-clinic"). For medical abortions, you take a pill to induce abortion. For surgical abortions, a procedure is performed to induce abortion. For general information about medical and surgical abortions, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Advocacy & Counseling[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

List of Additional Resources[edit | edit source]

  • Ministry of Health
  • The Association Nigérienne pour le Bien-Etre Familial's (ANBEF): "Since 1996, the Association Nigérienne pour le Bien-Etre Familial's (ANBEF) have been providing a comprehensive range of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) needs and issues including the prevention and management of HIV and AIDS, antenatal and post-natal care, the provision of post-abortion care in clinics and health huts in rural areas, treatment of male and female infertility, and pre-marital counselling. Importantly, the Member Association also trains young people in income-generating activities." This organization is a part of the International Planned Parenthood Federation.
  • Family Planning 2020 - Niger
  • PSI - Niger
  • Equaldex - Niger: Click here to learn about LGBTQ rights and laws in Niger.

References[edit | edit source]