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Difference between revisions of "Translations:Senegal/7/en"

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In Senegal, you can purchase contraception (birth control) without a prescription.<ref>[http://ocsotc.org/wp-content/uploads/worldmap/worldmap.html Back to OCsOTC SiteGlobal Oral Contraception Availability]</ref> According to a 2015 report, 18.1% of women in Senegal (who are married/in unions and of reproductive age) use any form of contraception, including traditional methods. The most common forms of contraception were injectables (6.5%), the pill (5.3%) and implants (2.8%). Traditional methods, like withdrawal (0.1%) and the rhythm method (0.4%) weren't very common. The report also found that 30% of Senegalese women had unmet family planning needs.<ref>[http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/family/trendsContraceptiveUse2015Report.pdf Trends in Contraceptive Use Worldwide 2015]</ref>
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In Senegal, you can purchase birth control pills without a prescription.<ref>[http://ocsotc.org/wp-content/uploads/worldmap/worldmap.html Back to OCsOTC SiteGlobal Oral Contraception Availability]</ref> According to a 2015 report, 18.1% of women in Senegal (who are married/in unions and of reproductive age) use any form of contraception, including traditional methods. The most common forms of contraception were injectables (6.5%), the pill (5.3%) and implants (2.8%). Traditional methods, like withdrawal (0.1%) and the rhythm method (0.4%) weren't very common. The report also found that 30% of Senegalese women had unmet family planning needs.<ref>[http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/family/trendsContraceptiveUse2015Report.pdf Trends in Contraceptive Use Worldwide 2015]</ref>

Latest revision as of 18:28, 16 December 2020

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Message definition (Senegal)
In Senegal, you can purchase birth control pills without a prescription.<ref>[http://ocsotc.org/wp-content/uploads/worldmap/worldmap.html Back to OCsOTC SiteGlobal Oral Contraception Availability]</ref> According to a 2015 report, 18.1% of women in Senegal (who are married/in unions and of reproductive age) use any form of contraception, including traditional methods. The most common forms of contraception were injectables (6.5%), the pill (5.3%) and implants (2.8%). Traditional methods, like withdrawal (0.1%) and the rhythm method (0.4%) weren't very common. The report also found that 30% of Senegalese women had unmet family planning needs.<ref>[http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/family/trendsContraceptiveUse2015Report.pdf Trends in Contraceptive Use Worldwide 2015]</ref>
TranslationIn Senegal, you can purchase birth control pills without a prescription.<ref>[http://ocsotc.org/wp-content/uploads/worldmap/worldmap.html Back to OCsOTC SiteGlobal Oral Contraception Availability]</ref> According to a 2015 report, 18.1% of women in Senegal (who are married/in unions and of reproductive age) use any form of contraception, including traditional methods. The most common forms of contraception were injectables (6.5%), the pill (5.3%) and implants (2.8%). Traditional methods, like withdrawal (0.1%) and the rhythm method (0.4%) weren't very common. The report also found that 30% of Senegalese women had unmet family planning needs.<ref>[http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/family/trendsContraceptiveUse2015Report.pdf Trends in Contraceptive Use Worldwide 2015]</ref>

In Senegal, you can purchase birth control pills without a prescription.[1] According to a 2015 report, 18.1% of women in Senegal (who are married/in unions and of reproductive age) use any form of contraception, including traditional methods. The most common forms of contraception were injectables (6.5%), the pill (5.3%) and implants (2.8%). Traditional methods, like withdrawal (0.1%) and the rhythm method (0.4%) weren't very common. The report also found that 30% of Senegalese women had unmet family planning needs.[2]