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Abidjan

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Abidjan.jpg
Contraception: Over-the-Counter condoms, pills (informally)
Contraception: Prescription Required pills (by law)
Emergency Contraception LNG (no prescription), UPA (prescription)
STIs testing available; no travel restrictions
Menstrual Products pads, maybe tampons
Abortion Law legal in some circumstances
LGBTQ Laws homosexuality legal
Related Pages Côte d'Ivoire


OVERVIEW

As the economic and cultural capital of Côte d'Ivoire, you will find various health care options in Abidjan. However, it is important to understand that the country has been recovering from decades of political and economic turmoil. This left the health care system in tatters, and it has needed to rebuild itself.[1] Furthermore, the government abandoned free public health care in 2012, reportedly due to poor management, corruption, and rising costs. However, some free services remain for pregnant women and their children.[2] Yet the Ivory Coast has a high maternal mortality rate (the 12th highest rate in the world). In the country, you can find contraceptive options such as pills and condoms. While birth control pills are technically by prescription-only, they also seem to be informally sold in pharmacies. You can purchase some types of emergency contraception at pharmacies over-the-counter, but some require a prescription. Abortion is legal in some circumstance, but it is not available upon request.

The majority of the country's population lives in the south, with the largest concentration in coastal cities like Abidjan. The people of Côte d'Ivoire come from many different ethnic groups, such as the Akan, Voltaique/Gur, and Northern Mande, and they speak many different dialects. Islam is the most common religion (43% of the population), but many people also practice Catholicism (17% of the population), Evangelical Christianity (11.8%), animist religions (3.6%), and Methodist Christianity (1.7%). About 12% of the population practices no religion, according to 2014 data.[3]

Contraception (Birth Control)[edit | edit source]

General Note: There are many types of contraceptives, also known as "birth control," including IUDs, oral contraceptives, patches, shots, and condoms, etc. If you would like to view a full list, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

In Côte d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast), you can purchase condoms and birth control pills at pharmacies without a prescription. While you may technically need a prescription for birth control pills, this is not typically enforced, and birth control pills are available over-the-counter.[4] [5] However, for other forms of birth control, such as implants, injectables, and IUDs, you may need to directly visit a hospital or clinic to obtain them.

In 2015, it was estimated that about 20% of women in Côte d'Ivoire (who were married/in unions and between the ages of 15-49) were using any form of contraception, including traditional methods. This was higher than the Western African average (about 17% of women). The most common forms of contraception were contraceptive pills (8% of women), injectables (3% of women), and condoms (2% of women). Some traditional methods were also practiced, including the rhythm method (4% of women) and withdrawal (less than 1% of women).[6]

The fertility rate is about 3.5 children per women.[3]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

  • There are many pharmacies in Abidjan, and some of them are open at night. The night pharmacies are available on a circulating schedule. For more information about pharmacies in your area in Abidjan, you can check out this link.

Costs[edit | edit source]

Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)[edit | edit source]

Important Notes: Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC as soon as possible after unprotected sex to prevent pregnancy. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click here and here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

In the Cote D'Ivoire (Ivory Coast), emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) are sometimes available over-the-counter at pharmacies, and sometimes a prescription is required. The legal status may depend on the type of pill you purchase, as it appears that LNG emergency contraceptive pills (such as NorLevo 1.5mg) may require a prescription, whereas UPA emergency contraceptive pills (such as ellaOne) do not.[7]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

  • You can find emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) at pharmacies and organizations associated with , and Some pills are sold over-the-counter, but some may require a prescription. See the section above for legal details. Some brands you may find are NorLevo 1.5mg (available by prescription), P2 (available by prescription), Pregnon (available by prescription), Pregnon 1 (available by prescription), Vikela (available by prescription), and ellaOne (available over-the-counter at pharmacies).[8]
  • Note: The longest-lasting EC is currently ellaOne. It lasts up to 5 days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Check to see if your country carries ellaOne. If your country doesn't carry ellaOne, copper IUDs may also prevent pregnancy up to 5 days after unprotected sex. If none of these options are available, and it's been over 3 days since you had unprotected sex, you can still take EC, which may work up to 5 days. Note that EC pills are not 100% effective and should be taken as soon as possible.

Costs[edit | edit source]

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs)[edit | edit source]

Important Notes - Learn about PEP and PrEP: If you think that you've been recently exposed to HIV (i.e. within 72 hours), seek out PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a month-long treatment to prevent HIV infection after exposure, and it may be available in your city. Take PEP as soon as possible. For more information, click here. If you are at risk of HIV exposure, seek out PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a daily oral pill that can prevent HIV infection before exposure. To learn more about PrEP, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

In Ivory Coast, there are no known travel or residency restrictions for people with HIV/AIDS. This means that you can enter the country, regardless of your HIV status, and you should not be deported if you test positive for HIV while you are in the country.[9]

The Ivory Coast is the country most impacted by HIV/AIDS in Western Africa, and 10% of all individuals who are affected by HIV/AIDS in Africa live in the Ivory Coast.[10]

Testing Facilities[edit | edit source]

Support[edit | edit source]

  • Brothers of Life: "Brothers for Life is a series of small facilitated and interactive sessions that allow men to talk about topics including sexual and reproductive health, their roles as sex partners, their roles in families and society, and HIV. It is designed to help prevent men from getting HIV and, if they test positive, to start treatment."
  • UNAIDS Cote d'Ivoire:

Costs[edit | edit source]

Medications & Vaccines[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Menstruation[edit | edit source]

Note: In addition to pads and tampons, you can also use menstrual cups and menstrual underwear for your period. To learn more about menstrual cups, click here. To learn more about menstrual underwear, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Gynecological Exams[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Private Hospitals[edit | edit source]

  • Polyclinique Farah: Polyclinique Farah is located in Marcory down the new bridge HKB. Numerous specialties. Address: F214, Abidjan 00225, Côte d’Ivoire. Phone: (+225) 21-26-00-93.
    • Gynecologist: Dr. Hoballah – Clinique Farah: Phone: (+225) 21-26-00-93
  • GMP (Groupe Médical du Plateau): This Hospital is located in Plateau near the great Mosque. Numerous specialties. Address: Avenue Lamblin, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. Phone (+225) 20 22 20 29/ 07 07 00 70.
    • Gynecologist: Dr. Bassam – Groupe Médical du Plateau (GMP): Phone: (+225) 20-22-20-29 / Cell: 07-07-00-70
    • Gynecologist: Dr. Zumelzu – Groupe Médical du Plateau (GMP): Phone: (+225) 20-22-20-29 / Cell: 07-07-00

Public Hospitals[edit | edit source]

  • CHU (University Hospital Center of Treichville): This university hospital, built in 1936, provides emergency care, diagnostic tests, consultations, and treatments to patients. It is generally more affordable than private facilities, but there have been reported issues with sanitation and lack of resources at the facility.[11] [12] Open 24 hours/day. Address: BP V 3, Côte d’Ivoire. Phone: +225 21 24 91 22.

Costs[edit | edit source]

Pregnancy[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

The maternal mortality rate (MMR) is 645 deaths per 100,000 live births, according to 2015 data. This MMR is ranked 12th in the world, and is roughly comparable to Guinea. [13]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

  • Polyclinique Farah: Polyclinique Farah is located in Marcory down the new bridge HKB. Numerous specialties. Address: F214, Abidjan 00225, Côte d’Ivoire. Phone: (+225) 21-26-00-93.
  • GMP (Groupe Médical du Plateau): This Hospital is located in Plateau near the great Mosque. Numerous specialties. Address: Avenue Lamblin, Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. Phone (+225) 20 22 20 29/ 07 07 00 70.

Costs[edit | edit source]

In 2012, the government abandoned the free health care system originally offered to the public. However, some free services are maintained for pregnant people, including free delivery services and free health care for diseases afflicting children.[2]

Abortion[edit | edit source]

Important Note: There are two main types of abortions: medical (also known as the "abortion pill") and surgical (also known as "in-clinic"). For medical abortions, you take a pill to induce abortion. For surgical abortions, a procedure is performed to induce abortion. For general information about medical and surgical abortions, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

In Cote d'Ivoire, abortion is only permitted to save the life of the pregnant person. The abortion must also be approved of by two medical professionals. The details of the abortion law can be found in Section III. Avortement, Article 366 of the Penal Code.[14]

These strict laws mean that women may obtain abortions from clandestine, illegal providers. These providers may not be properly trained or may be operate in unsanitary, unsafe conditions.[15]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Advocacy & Counseling[edit | edit source]

  • Police: Call 110/111/170
  • Medecins Urgence (ambulance): Call 07-082626
  • SOS Medecins (ambulance): Call 185
  • Blue Cross - Abidjan: Tel: 20 37 00 53
  • Emergency Doctors - Abidjan: Tel: 07 08 26 26

LGBTQ+ Resources[edit | edit source]

List of Additional Resources[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]