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Astana

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OVERVIEW

Contraception (Birth Control)[edit | edit source]

General Note: There are many types of contraceptives, also known as "birth control," including IUDs, oral contraceptives, patches, shots, and condoms, etc. If you would like to view a full list, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

In Kazakhstan, you can purchase condoms and birth control pills at pharmacies without a prescription. While you may technically need a prescription for birth control pills, this is not typically enforced, and birth control pills are available over-the-counter.[1] [2] However, for other forms of contraception, such as implants, injectables, and IUDs, you may need to directly visit a hospital or clinic to obtain them.

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)[edit | edit source]

Important Notes: Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC as soon as possible after unprotected sex to prevent pregnancy. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click here and here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

In Kazakhstan, emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) are available. A prescription is technically required, and some pharmacies may ask for a prescription, but it appears that some pharmacies may informally sell such pills without a prescription.[3] You can find emergency contraceptive pills at pharmacies or programs affiliated with the International Planned Parenthood Foundation.[4] [5]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

  • You can find the emergency contraceptive pill (morning after pill) in pharmacies in Kazakhstan. It appears that some pharmacies my ask for a prescription, as it technically legally required, but some others do not ask for a prescription. Some brands you may find in pharmacies are Escapelle, Postinor, and Dvella.
  • Note: The longest-lasting EC is currently ellaOne. It lasts up to 5 days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Check to see if your country carries ellaOne. If your country doesn't carry ellaOne, copper IUDs may also prevent pregnancy up to 5 days after unprotected sex. If none of these options are available, and it's been over 3 days since you had unprotected sex, you can still take EC, which may work up to 5 days. Note that EC pills are not 100% effective and should be taken as soon as possible.

Costs[edit | edit source]

  • You can sometimes find emergency contraceptive pills distributed free of charge if you go to a family planning clinics or youth clinics where such pills are purchased and distributed by the local health department.[6]
  • The social security does not cover or reimburse the purchase of emergency contraception.[7]

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs)[edit | edit source]

Important Notes - Learn about PEP and PrEP: If you think that you've been recently exposed to HIV (i.e. within 72 hours), seek out PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a month-long treatment to prevent HIV infection after exposure, and it may be available in your city. Take PEP as soon as possible. For more information, click here. If you are at risk of HIV exposure, seek out PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a daily oral pill that can prevent HIV infection before exposure. To learn more about PrEP, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

For short-term visitors, there are no known travel restrictions for people with HIV/AIDS. This means that you will not be asked about your HIV status upon entering the country. However, if you want to become a legal resident or worker in Kazakhstan, you may need to take an HIV test and prove that you are HIV-negative.[8] Some sources seem to say that you do need to take the test, and some sources say you do not -- so, if you know the latest status, please update this page.

In 2017, it was estimated that about 27,000 adults and children were living with HIV in Kazakhstan, according to UNAIDS. In total, the HIV rate impacted about 0.2% of the adult population. Furthermore, it was estimated that about 43% of adults living with HIV were on ART (i.e. treatment), and a large percentage of people with HIV received a late HIV diagnosis.[9] This means that, while HIV rates are still rather low in the country, there is a need for a higher rate of testing, treatment, and education.

Testing Facilities[edit | edit source]

Support[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Medications & Vaccines[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Menstruation[edit | edit source]

Note: In addition to pads and tampons, you can also use menstrual cups and menstrual underwear for your period. To learn more about menstrual cups, click here. To learn more about menstrual underwear, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Gynecological Exams[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Pregnancy[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Abortion[edit | edit source]

Important Note: There are two main types of abortions: medical (also known as the "abortion pill") and surgical (also known as "in-clinic"). For medical abortions, you take a pill to induce abortion. For surgical abortions, a procedure is performed to induce abortion. For general information about medical and surgical abortions, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

In Kazakhstan, abortion is legally available upon request during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. Furthermore, if the pregnancy endangers the life of the pregnant person, the abortion is permitted during any time period of the pregnancy. If the pregnant person is under 18 years old, parental consent is required. [10]

There are certain procedures and laws that determine how abortions should be performed. Generally speaking, it is required that the pregnant person consults with a doctor before the pregnancy, and there should be clinical laboratory tests. The abortion procedure can only be performed in a hospital that has a state license, an operative unit, or a department of intensive care. While medical and surgical abortions are both available, you will generally find "the abortion pill" (i.e. Mifepristone and Misoprostol) at pharmacies much more often than in hospitals or clinics, according to sources.[10]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Advocacy & Counseling[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

List of Additional Resources[edit | edit source]

  • Ministry of Health
  • The Kazakhstan Association for Sex and Reproductive Health (KMPA): "The Kazakhstan Association for Sex and Reproductive Health (KMPA) was established in 1997, in close collaboration with other IPPF Member Associations in central Asia, including those in Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. The organization currently has 13 branches and 2 regional offices, in Kostanay and Astana. KMPA’s outlets are all fully equipped to deliver contraceptive advice and services and antenatal and post-natal care. The organization trains trainers in sexual and reproductive health (SRH) teaching, education and awareness raising, covering the full range of SRH concerns including unwanted pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) (including HIV and AIDS), contraception and abortion. KMPA is particularly focused on the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of refugees, internally displaced persons (IDPs) and other migrants, and the prevalence of trafficking women and children."
  • Equaldex - Kazakhstan: Click here to learn about LGBTQ rights and laws in Kazakhstan.

References[edit | edit source]