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Bahrain

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OVERVIEW

While Bahrain is a generally conservative and religious country, the laws of the country are socially liberal for the Persian Gulf region. The 2002 Constitution states that all people are equal and that there should be no discrimination on the basis of "sex, origin, language, religion or creed."[1] Women have the right to vote and run for office in Bahrain, and they're entitled to the right to dress (no headscarves or any other clothing items are required). [2] While homosexuality is considered "immoral," it is not explicitly illegal. [3] Finally, Bahrain is the home to people of a wide range of backgrounds (less than 50% of the population is Bahraini), leading to cultural influences from many nations and peoples.[4]

At Bahraini pharmacies, you can obtain condoms and oral contraceptives (birth control pills) without a prescription, and you can obtain other forms of contraception, such as intrauterine devices (IUDs) and contraceptive injectables, at clinics and hospitals. There are many clinics that provide HIV and other STI tests, although there are limited organizations and social services available to people with STIs. Furthermore, abortion is technically legal, though it is extremely rare and requires approval from physicians.

However, Bahrain is still a country that follows traditional practices and laws. There are no registered emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) that we're aware of. While you can use regular birth control pills or IUDs as a form of emergency contraception, the health care system of Bahrain does not freely provide emergency contraceptive pills to anyone who needs them. Furthermore, Bahrain is extremely strict regarding foreigners and STIs. While tourists can visit Bahrain, regardless of their HIV status, a foreigner who plans to live in or work in Bahrain must test as HIV-negative. If they are found to be HIV-positive in Bahrain, they will be immediately deported. It should be noted that Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) does not appear to be available in Bahrain, as of 2018. There is also no nationwide HPV vaccination program, but you can receive the HPV vaccine at hospitals and clinics in the country.

Finally, like many other Persian Gulf countries, is illegal to be pregnant and unmarried in Bahrain. If you're found to be pregnant and unmarried in Bahrain, you may face legal repercussions. If you're a foreigner, you'll be imprisoned and/or deported. If you're pregnant and unmarried as a Bahraini, you could face possible imprisonment.

Contraception (Birth Control)[edit]

General Note: There are many types of contraceptives, also known as "birth control," including IUDs, oral contraceptives, patches, shots, and condoms, etc. If you would like to view a full list, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In Bahrain, you can obtain condoms and oral contraceptives (birth control pills) without a prescription at pharmacies, hospitals, and clinics.[5] [6] You can find other forms of contraception, such as intrauterine devices (IUDs) and contraceptive injectables, at hospitals and clinics as well.

The fertility rate for women in Bahrain is less than 2 children born per woman, which is roughly comparable to many other developed nations in the world.[7] In 2015, around 66% of women in Bahrain (who were married/in unions and of reproductive) used some form of birth control, including traditional methods. This rate of usage was noticeably higher than the Western Asian average (58%), however it was still found that around 11% of women in Bahrain had unmet family planning needs.[8]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • If you want to purchase condoms, you can purchase them without a prescription at pharmacies in Bahrain. For a list of pharmacies in Bahrain, click here. Furthermore, condoms can be purchased online and delivered to your local address in Bahrain. For example, the Nasser Pharmacy website has over 30 types of Durex, Unity, and Skins condoms for sale, which can be purchased in BHD and shipped to residences in Bahrain. You can also find condoms for sale on the Care To Beauty website, which ships products to Bahrain as well.
  • You can find oral contraceptives (birth control pills) sold in pharmacies, hospitals, and clinics in Bahrain. No prescription is required. Some of the brands you can expect to see are Diane, Graciel, Gynera, Marvelon, Yasmin, and Yaz.[9] You can also order birth control pills online from websites like InhousePharmacy.vu, which carries 16 different types of birth control pills (as of May 2018) and serves many countries, including Bahrain.
  • You can get an intrauterine device (IUD) in Bahrain. At Royal Bahrain Hospital (RBH), they have both hormonal and non-hormonal IUDs, and the insertion procedure costs BD50, as of May 201
  • You can get contraceptive shots/injectables in Bahrain. At Royal Bahrain Hospital (RBH), they have Depo-Provera, which lasts three months. The shot costs BD6, as of May 2018.
  • We don't know if contraceptive implants are available in Bahrain. If you do know, please update this page.

Costs[edit]

  • While these costs may be higher than average (because they are from a private hospital), here are the prices for birth control pills sold at Royal Bahrain Hospital (RBH), as of May 2018: Diane (BD 2.150), Yasmine (BD 2.77), and Yaz (BD 4.67).

Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)[edit]

Important Notes: Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC as soon as possible after unprotected sex. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click here and here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In Bahrain, emergency emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) do not appear to be available, based on conversations we have had with pharmacists. They are also not registered in Bahrain.[10]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • In Bahrain, you cannot legally obtain dedicated emergency contraceptive pills (birth control pills). However, you can use regular birth control pills as emergency contraception. Here is one guide that may provide useful information on how to do this.
  • If you want to access an emergency contraceptive method, you can get an IUD, which can prevent pregnancy up to five days after unprotected sex.

Costs[edit]

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs)[edit]

Important Notes - Learn about PEP and PrEP: If you think that you've been recently exposed to HIV (i.e. within 72 hours), seek out PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a month-long treatment to prevent HIV infection after exposure, and it may be available in your city. Take PEP as soon as possible. For more information, click here. If you are at risk of HIV exposure, seek out PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a daily oral pill that can prevent HIV infection before exposure. To learn more about PrEP, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

If you are a foreigner who is visiting Bahrain for a short-term stay, you can freely visit the country, regardless of your HIV status. You will not be asked for a medical certificate or proof of your HIV status. However, if you are a foreigner who plans to stay in the country for longer than 30 days, you will need to apply for a residence permit. To obtain the residence permit, you will be required to take medical exams in the country, including an HIV test. If you are found to be HIV-positive during the course of your exams, you will not be granted a residence permit and you will be immediately deported. There are rare exceptions to this case for diplomats, but in the case of nearly all other foreigners, an HIV-positive diagnosis means deportation.[11]

Testing Facilities[edit]

  • Royal Bahrain Hospital (RBH): This private hospital provides an STI testing package (for BD45), which includes the following: Anti Hep C Virus, Anti Chlamydia Antibody IGG, Anti Chlamydia Antibody IGM, HIV I & II – ELISA KIT 1, Herpes Simplex Virus II (HSG) – IGG, Herpes Simplex Virus II (HSV) – IGM, Hep B Surface Antigen (HBsAg), Treponema Pallidum Antibody (TPAB), Treponema Pallidum Haemagglutination). They also provide separate tests for Syphillis (BD10) and Gonorrhea (BD48). These prices were quoted by the hospital in May 2018. Address: 29, Manama, Bahrain. Hours: Open 24 hours. Phone: +973 1724 6800.
  • Better2Know: They have clinics in Manama, Bu Ghazal, and Zinj, and they can test for HIV, Herpes, Chlamydia, Gonorrhoea, Syphilis, HPV, Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Mycoplasma, Ureaplasma, Gardnerella, and Trichomonas. You can book an appointment online. "Better2Know are the world’s leading private provider of sexual health testing services. Our service is available in Manama to serve Bahrain. We offer a world class service, from the moment you book, to your sample collection appointment and getting your results, we are with you every step of the way. When you are worried, and cannot talk to anyone else about your sexual health, you can contact us and we will do our best to help you. After you have booked your STI test, if you would like, we can send you login details to your secure patient area. Here you will see details of your appointment (time, date and location), and this is where we will update your results as soon as they are back from the laboratory. All of our testing in Bahrain is private and confidential. If you do test positive we will help you with advice, treatment and referrals. Better2Know follows national guidelines in the event of a positive test."

Support[edit]

  • UNAIDS Bahrain: While Bahrain doesn't have a specific representative from UNAIDS, there is a Regional Support Team for Middle East and North Africa. The current contact person (as of May 2018) is Yamina Chakkar (phone: +201093260898; email: ChakkarY@unaids.org)
  • Avert - Middle East and North Africa: This website provides information related to HIVA/AIDS in MENA.
  • International HIV/AIDS Alliance - MENA Programme: "The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) programme is working to improve the sexual health of men who have sex with men."

Costs[edit]

Medications & Vaccines[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • If you have a yeast infection, you can go to the pharmacy, hospital, or clinic for medication. No prescription is required. You may find Candivast, which is sold for BD 2.79 at Royal Bahrain Hospital, as of May 2018. If you go to a pharmacy, you can ask for Candivast or Fluconazole, which is the type of medication used to treat fungal infections. While they may not specifically have Candivast or Fluconazole, the pharmacists may have similar products that you can use.
  • If you have a urinary tract infection (UTI), you can obtain alkaur powder in Bahrain. No prescription is required and the cost is BD 1, as of May 2018. However, if you want antibiotics to treat the UTI, you will need a prescription. At Royal Bahrain Hospital (RBH), you can obtain antibiotics like Augmentin (BD 10.50) and Sipromax (BD 6.70), as of May 2018.
  • There is no mandatory nationwide HPV vaccination program in Bahrain, as of July 2017. However, you can get the HPV vaccine in hospitals and clinics in Bahrain. For example, at Royal Bahrain Hospital (RBH), women can receive the HPV vaccine for BD55 and men can receive the HPV vaccine for BD85, as of May 2018. It is estimated that about 43% of women (ages 15-49) had ever been screened for cervical cancer, but there's no data related to how many women have received HPV vaccines.[12]
  • There is currently no Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PreP) program in Bahrain, as of May 2018.[13]

Costs[edit]

  • For yeast infection medication, you can expect to pay around BD 2.79, as of May 2018.
  • For antibiotics to treat a UTI, you can expect to pay around BD 6 to BD 11, as of May 2018.
  • For an HPV vaccine, you can expect to pay around BD 55 (if you're a woman) and BD 85 (if you're a man), as of May 2018.

Menstruation[edit]

Note: In addition to pads and tampons, you can also use menstrual cups and menstrual underwear for your period. To learn more about menstrual cups, click here. To learn more about menstrual underwear, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In Bahrain, the most common form of menstrual products is pads or pantyliners. While tampons are sold, they are less readily available and less commonly used by women. You can read a 2015 post here, about a foreigner women trying to find tampons in Bahrain. There are some small-scale sellers of alternative menstrual products, like menstrual cups, but they are not common. You can read a blog post here about a local woman in Bahrain who uses a DivaCup (menstrual cup).

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • In Bahrain, the most common form of menstrual products are pads/pantyliners. You should be able to find them in supermarkets, pharmacies, and online shops.
  • While tampons are less common than pads, you can find them sold in Bahrain at certain supermarkets, pharmacies, and online stores. For example, you can find tampons sold online at Nasser Pharmacy and Wafi, both which are online retailers that specially provide for the Bahraini market. You can also find organic tampons sold through online vendors, such as iHerb, Desert Cart, and UBuy.
  • Regarding menstrual cups, you may be able to find DivaCup at Organic Foods & Café in Seef Mall.[14] You can also find menstrual cups sold through online retailers, such as iHerb (which sells DivaCup and Lunette), UBuy (which sells DivaCup, LENA, Blossom, Dutchess, Athena, etc) and Desert Cart (which sells DivaCup and MoonCup).
  • You can also find alternative menstrual products, such as menstrual cups, sold in Dubai.

Costs[edit]

Gynecological Exams[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

You can find public health facilities and private health facilities in Bahrain. The government manages 24 public health centers and three clinics in Bahrain, as well as Salmaniya Medical Complex. To learn more about the public health centers in Bahrain, click here.

Public Hospitals[edit]

  • Salmaniya Medical Complex: This is the main public hospital in Bahrain, established in 1979, which has an Obstetrics & Gynecology Clinic. They accept walk-ins, but they prefer appointments. The hospital has fixed prices, which vary, depending on whether you're a Bahraini or non-Bahraini. For a list of prices for non-Bahrainis, click here. Address: Rd No 2904, Manama, Bahrain. Hours: Open 24 hours. Phone: +973 1728 8888.

Private Hospitals & Practitioners[edit]

  • Royal Bahrain Hospital (RBH): This is one of the best private hospitals in Bahrain.
    • Recommended Gynecologist - Dr. Kiran J. Bijlani has been recommended by many locals and can be found practicing at Royal Bahrain Hospital. From her website: "Dr. Kiran J. Bijlani, a Consultant OB-Gynae has over 21 years of experience in the field of Obstetrics and Gynecology and is very popular in the medical field in Bahrain. She has special interest in treating patients for deficiencies in pelvic floor support, complicated fibroids and ovarian and tubal pathologies and has introduced many innovative techniques in the field of Obstetrics and Gynecology." Address: 29, Manama, Bahrain. Hours: Open 24 hours. Phone: +973 1724 6800.
    • Recommended Gynecologist - Dr Nissar: This ob/gyn has been recommended by a local and can be found at Royal Bahrain Hospital (Address: 29, Manama, Bahrain; Hours: Open 24 hours; Phone: +973 1724 6800).
  • Dr Sabah Baig (phone: 17232444) or her husband Dr. Dabeer Salaria. She has her own private clinic in Khaleej Polytechnic (next to Salmaniya) but she operates in American Mission Hospital, Awali Hospital and Ibn Al-Nafees Hospital.
  • Dr Sharifa Ali (phone: 17680088). This ob/gyn has been recommended by a local. She has her own clinic and she also operates at Ibn Al-Nafees Hospital (Address: Rd No 3302, Manama, Bahrain; Hours: Open 24 hours; Phone: +973 1782 8230).
  • Dr Aisha Bhuneshwari: This ob/gyn has been recommended by a local and can be found at Shifa Al Jazeera Medical Centre (Address: Manama, Bahrain; Hours: Open 24 hours; Phone: +973 1728 8000). The hospital has a 24-hour pharmacy and it accepts a variety of insurance providers, such as MedGulf, MedNet, Cigna, MetLife, etc.

Costs[edit]

  • At Royal Bahrain Hospital (RBH), a general ob/gyn check starts with a consultation for BD20. They have 2 types of PAP Smears (the doctor will probably decide which one to go with). A Cervical Liquid PAP is BD30. A Cervical Liquid Based Cytology – BD40.

Pregnancy[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In Bahrain, a pregnant woman must be married, according to the law.[15] If you're pregnant and visit a medical provider in Bahrain, the doctor will probably assume that you are married. You may be asked for a marriage certificate or information about the father. Furthermore, once the baby is born, the medical staff will need to know the name and identity of the father (and sometimes before the birth). Typically, a woman must be married to a man for a birth certificate to be issued.

If you're found to be pregnant and unmarried in Bahrain, you may face legal repercussions. If you're a foreigner, you'll be imprisoned and/or deported. If you're pregnant and unmarried as a Bahraini, you could face possible imprisonment. Your partner may also be imprisoned or deported.[16] For these reasons, if you are pregnant and unmarried, it is highly advised that you do not seek out medical treatment or residency in Bahrain for the duration of your pregnancy.

To learn more about giving birth in Bahrain, click here.

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

Public Hospitals & Providers[edit]

  • Jidhafs Maternity Hospital: "The aimed is to deliver a high quality of medical services to wide sector of Gynecology and obstetrics patients and to reduce the pressure of maternity services delivered by S.M.C. to be specialized center for high risk patients only." Phone: +973 1755 6888
  • Rural Maternity Hospital: Main objective is "to deliver a high quality of medical care to wide sector of obstetric and long stay patients in order to reduce the pressure on S.M.C maternity services and long stay wards in Muharraq."

Private Hospitals & Providers[edit]

  • Dr. Kiran J. Bijlani: She has been recommended by many locals and can be found practicing at Royal Bahrain Hospital (RBH). From her website: "Dr. Kiran J. Bijlani, a Consultant OB-Gynae has over 21 years of experience in the field of Obstetrics and Gynecology and is very popular in the medical field in Bahrain. She has special interest in treating patients for deficiencies in pelvic floor support, complicated fibroids and ovarian and tubal pathologies and has introduced many innovative techniques in the field of Obstetrics and Gynecology."

Costs[edit]

Abortion[edit]

Important Note: There are two main types of abortions: medical (also known as the "abortion pill") and surgical (also known as "in-clinic"). For medical abortions, you take a pill to induce abortion. For surgical abortions, a procedure is performed to induce abortion. For general information about medical and surgical abortions, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In Bahrain, abortion is technically legal and available upon request, according to the Penal Code of 20 March 1976.[17] This means that all reasons for abortion are technically permitted. However, the reality of abortion availability is much more complicated. For an abortion to be legally permitted, a panel of physicians must approve of the abortion. Furthermore, only a licensed physician may perform the abortion.[18] If someone receives an abortion without the advice and assistance of a doctor, they may receive a 6-month jail term or a fine of up to BD 50.[19]

While abortion is legal in Bahrain, it is not very common. This is because physicians rarely grant abortions, unless the pregnancy seriously endangers the life of the pregnant person, if the pregnancy seriously endangers the life of the baby, if there is serious risk of fetal impairment or miscarriage, or if the baby has stopped growing or has died. In other words, it is extremely rare for a woman to seek out a legal abortion for a non-medical reason and be granted abortion services. Furthermore, there are social stigmas, community pressures, and shame related to abortion and premarital sex in Bahrain. As a result, people may feel extremely uncomfortable seeking out legal abortions, even if they believe that may qualify to receive them. For this reason, it's much more common for women to seek out abortions through unofficial channels, such as purchasing "abortion pills" on the black market, or by traveling abroad to obtain abortion services.

It should be noted that the "abortion pills" sold in Bahrain are often times pills for gastric ulcers, sold on the black market.[20] These tactics can be risky, since they are unregulated, and may lead to health issues. Furthermore, the distributors of "abortion pills" and providers of clandestine abortions may not be properly trained or informed regarding medical procedures.

For more information:

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • In Bahrain, abortion is technically permitted and available upon request. However, it is extremely rare and locals report that abortions are typically only granted for medical reasons, such as when the pregnancy endangers the life of the pregnant person, when the pregnancy endangers the life of the child, or when there is risk of serious fetal malformation. To get more information about abortion laws, procedures, and services in Bahrain, you can contact Bahrain Family Planning Association (BFPA): Address: Villa 377, Road No.1210, PO Box 20326, Manama. Phone: +97317232 233 or +97317256 622. Fax: +97317244 671
  • According to one local (June 2018): "If the baby stops growing before 12 weeks and there is no bleeding, then you will be referred to Salmaniya Hospital for a scheduled termination/D&C. They will make you wait up to 2 weeks to spontaneously miscarry, if your blood work comes back clear. Also, if the baby dies in utero, you will be referred to Salmaniya Hospital." Note that this is a private anecdote and has not been fully verified.
  • If you are pregnant and wish to obtain an abortion, your best option is to seek an abortion outside Bahrain. While there is an underground illegal abortion industry in every country, including Bahrain, it's not safe and not recommended. Rather, you may consider traveling to countries like Turkey, Greece, Azerbaijan or India, where you can legally obtain an abortion. If you are interested in traveling to Europe, there are also many countries where abortion is legal.

Costs[edit]

  • If you are pregnant and considering getting an abortion outside Bahrain, you will need to consider the following costs: visa processing costs, transportation to the country where you will be obtaining an abortion, hotel or accommodation costs in that country, cost of the abortion in the country and the total amount of days you may need to be in the country both before and after the abortion.

Advocacy & Counseling[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • Police/ Fire department: Call 999
  • Ambulance: Call 998
  • National Emergency call center: Call 999
  • Violence against women: Call 1787 0302
  • Emergency – Criminal Investigations (CID): Call 992
  • Local Police Stations: East Riffa Police Station: Call 1777 3158; West Riffa Police Station: Call 1766 4606; Exhibition Road Police Station: Call 1755 0629; Hawak Police Station: 1784 9009; Hidd Police Station: 1767 1212; Hoora Police Station: 1729 1555; Naim Police Station: 1725 8210; Samaheej Police Station: 1733 4401; Umm-Al Hasam Police Station: 1772 8229; Zallaq Police Station: 1763 1211
  • Women's Crisis Care International: "Women's Crisis Care International is the first and only violence crisis response center in the Arabian Gulf. WCCI provides violence crisis response services for victims of domestic and sexual abuse in Bahrain. Call 3844 7588 for 24 hour support in English. You can also visit us at our official partner, American Mission Hospital, in Manama, Saar, or Amwaj. All services are 100% confidential and free of charge. All women are welcome." English helpline: 38447588 .. الخط الساخن العربي: 66710901

Costs[edit]

List of Additional Resources[edit]

  •  Click here to learn about LGBTQ rights and laws in Bahrain. As of May 2018, homosexuality is a grey area (i.e. not clearly legal or illegal) and it is legal to change gender. However, homosexual marriage is illegal, and there are no laws to protect LGBTQ people from discrimination related to housing or employment. Conversion therapy is also legal in Bahrain, but we don't know to what extent, if any, it is practiced.
  • Supreme Council for Women: "The Supreme Council for Women was established on 22nd August 2001 upon Amiri order No. 44 which was amended by the Amiri Orders No. 55 in 2001, No. 2 in 2002, and the Royal Decree No. 36 in 2004... The Supreme Council for Women is to be established and directly affiliated to His Majesty the King. It is considered the reference for all official bodies in regards to women affairs and its headquarters is to be in Riffa."
  • Bahrain Women Association: Call: +973 1724 6471. Email: info@bahrainws.org
  • Bahrain Business Women Society: "Bahrain Businesswomen’s Society was founded by 16 Bahraini business women." Address: Building: 112, Road: 333, Block: 332, Mahooz, Kingdom of Bahrain. Phone: +973 17721188. Fax: +973 17721116. Email:info@bahrainbusinesswomen.com
  • American Women Association: "The American Women’s Association (Bahrain) is a non-profit organization founded to further relations among all women residing in Bahrain and to promote Bahraini and International friendship." Registered 1974 - 2015. No. 19/C/RXW, P.O. Box 26135, Manama, Bahrain. Phone: +973 3888 4924. Email: info@awabahrain.org
  • Women's Crisis Care International: "Women's Crisis Care International is the first and only violence crisis response center in the Arabian Gulf. WCCI provides violence crisis response services for victims of domestic and sexual abuse in Bahrain. Call 3844 7588 for 24 hour support in English. You can also visit us at our official partner, American Mission Hospital, in Manama, Saar, or Amwaj. All services are 100% confidential and free of charge. All women are welcome." English helpline: 38447588 .. الخط الساخن العربي: 66710901
  • Migrant Workers Protection Society: "Migrant Workers Protection Society (MWPS) was established in 2005 under license 25/C/AC (ج/أج/ ٢٥) from the Ministry of Social Development. Our Mission Statement is to seek to help expatriate workers achieve their basic human rights in accordance with internationally recognized standards." Address: MWPS Office P O Box 5561 Kingdom of Bahrain, Flat 2, Building 647, Road 3625, Block 336 Adliya.Call Office: +973 17827895. Email: mwpsbah2@gmail.com
  • Bahrain Human Rights Society: "The Bahrain Human Rights Society (BHRS) is a non-governmental organisation established on May 31, 2001. It has more than 100 registered members and is a leading human rights organisation in the Gulf region. Its objective is to increase awareness of human rights principles and related international conventions by employing legitimate means to imply respect for human rights and freedom for all." Phone: +973 39933654
  • Bahrain Center for Human Rights: This organization is headquartered in Denmark but focuses on issues in Bahrain. "The Bahrain Center for Human Rights (BCHR) is a non-profit, non-governmental organization, registered with the Bahraini Ministry of Labor and Social Services since July 2002. Despite an order by the authorities in November 2004 to close, the BCHR is still functioning after gaining a wide local and international support for its struggle to promote human rights in Bahrain." Phone: 004553893133.

References[edit]

  1. Bahrain's Constitution of 2002
  2. [http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/meast/02/25/bahrain.country.profile/index.html Is Bahrain the most modern of the Gulf states?]
  3. https://www.equaldex.com/region/bahrain
  4. CIA World Factbook - Bahrain
  5. Global Oral Contraception Availability
  6. Free the Pill: Where on Earth?
  7. CIA World Factbook - Bahrain
  8. Trends in Contraceptive Use Worldwide 2015
  9. [Conversation with Bahrain pharmacy and Bahrain hospital, May 2018]
  10. EC Status and Availability: Bahrain
  11. BAHRAIN - REGULATIONS ON ENTRY, STAY AND RESIDENCE FOR PLHIV
  12. Human Papillomavirus and Related Diseases Report: BAHRAIN
  13. PrEPWatch World Map
  14. Menstrual Cup Map
  15. Know your rights in Bahrain
  16. Know your rights in Bahrain
  17. Bahrain Penal Code, 1976
  18. Abortion Policies, A Global Review - Bahrain (United Nations Report
  19. Bahrain Penal Code, 1976
  20. Bahrain women in high-risk abortions