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Bucharest

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Romania / Bucharest
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OVERVIEW

In Romania, you can find many health care resources. While the government pursued a traditional and natalist policy for decades (late 1960s until 1990), Romania has seen increasingly progressive policies since 1990. You can purchase birth control pills and condoms without a prescription. There are many brands of birth control pills, especially those from European and US-based pharmaceutical companies, in addition to other contraceptive methods. You can also obtain emergency contraception (the morning after pill) at pharmacies without a prescription. While there are many sites for obtaining an STI test, and there are no travel restrictions related to HIV status, there are still taboos regarding the discussion of sex and STIs to consider. You can buy menstrual cups from online Romanian vendors. Abortion is legal upon request in the first 14 weeks of pregnancy.

Contraception (Birth Control)[edit]

General Note: There are many types of contraceptives, also known as "birth control," including IUDs, oral contraceptives, patches, shots, and condoms, etc. If you would like to view a full list, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In Romania, you can purchase birth control pills and condoms over-the-counter (no prescription needed) at pharmacies.[1] [2] According to a 2015 report, 69% of Romanian women (who are of reproductive age and married or in unions) use some form of contraception, and 9% of the same demographic of women have unmet family planning needs. The most common forms of contraception were found to be condoms (24.1%), birth control pills (17.2%), the rhythm method (10.4%), IUDs (6.7%) and female sterilization (4.2%). The study showed a very low rate of usage of contraceptive implants (supposedly, it was 0%).[3]

For decades, the Romanian government took a hardline natalist approach to family planning. Under the government of Nicolae Ceaușescu (1967-1989), abortion was banned, divorce was difficult to obtain and homosexuality was criminalized. Women were strongly encouraged to have many children, and single women who were childless were penalized by the government.[4] Sex education programs were essentially nonexistent until the communist government fell in 1990.[5] These policies helped shape the current cultural climate, where discussion of sex remains relatively taboo.[6] However, Romania is a society that is constantly evolving, and younger generations may take a more open approach to sexuality.

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • In Romania, you can purchase contraceptive pills (birth control pills) over-the-counter. No prescription is required. You can find both phasic and combined pills, and the brands typically come from Germany, Hungary and the USA. Some of the brands you can expect to see are Anteovin, Cilest, Desorelle, Diane-35, Exluton, Femoden, Jeanine, Logest, Marvelon, Mercilin, Microgynon, Microval, Minidril, Minulet, Noriday, Novynette, Qlaira, Rigevidon, Tri-Minulet, Tri-Regol, Trinordiol, Trinovum, Triquilar, Yasmin and Yaz.
  • If you want a contraceptive injectable/shot, you can find Depo-Provera SAS 150mg/ml, Megestron and Noristerat in Romania.
  • If you want a contraceptive implant, you can find Norplant (Implants with Levonorgestrel 36 x 6 mg) in Romania.
  • If you want an IUD, you can find Mirena (Hormonal IUDs with Levonorgestrel 52 mg) in Romania.

Costs[edit]

Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)[edit]

Important Notes: Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC as soon as possible after unprotected sex to prevent pregnancy. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click here and here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In Romania, you can purchase emergency contraception (the morning after pill) without a prescription. There are no age restrictions for purchasing EC.[7]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • In Romania, you can find emergency contraception (the morning after pill) at pharmacies and clinics. It's sold over-the-counter, so no prescription is required. You can find ellaOne, which is the most effective EC on the market today. You take 1 pill within 120 hours after unprotected sex. You can also find Escapelle (take 1 pill within 120 hours after unprotected sex) and Postinor-2 (tke 2 pills within 120 hours after unprotected sex).[8]
  • If you can't access dedicated emergency contraception, you can use regular birth control pills as replacement EC. To do this, you can take Microval (take 50 pills within 120 hours after unprotected sex). You can also take progestin-estrogen combined pills but remember that, in 28-day packs, only the first 21 pills can be used. For all of these pills, you take 4 pills within 120 hours after unprotected sex and take 4 more pills 12 hours later: Microgynon, Minidril and Rigevidon.[9]
  • You can also get an IUD to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex. See the "Contraception (Birth Control)" section for details.

Costs[edit]

In 2013, LNG emergency contraception was about € 20.[10]

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs)[edit]

Important Notes - Learn about PEP and PrEP: If you think that you've been recently exposed to HIV (i.e. within 72 hours), seek out PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a month-long treatment to prevent HIV infection after exposure, and it may be available in your city. Take PEP as soon as possible. For more information, click here. If you are at risk of HIV exposure, seek out PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a daily oral pill that can prevent HIV infection before exposure. To learn more about PrEP, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

There are no known travel or residency restrictions related to HIV status. You can enter Romania without a medical certificate. If you're a foreigner and you test as HIV positive when you're in the country, you will not be deported. You can carry antiretroviral medication on you for personal use.[11]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

Testing Facilities[edit]

Support[edit]

  • Institute for infectious diseases "Matei Bals": Provides HIV treatment. Address: 1, Dr. Grozovici Street, sector 2, Bucharest
  • Hospital for infectious diseases "Victor Babes": Provides HIV treatment. Address: 281, Soseaua Mihai Bravu, Bucharest
  • UNOPA (National union of organisations for people affected by HIV/AIDS): This is an HIV NGO working in Romania. Address: 24 Bul. N. Balcescu, sc.C, et. 2, ap.7, sector 1, Bucharest , Phone & fax: +40 21 319 9329
  • ARAS - Asociatia Româna Anti-SIDA: This is an HIV NGO working in Romania. They also have an HIV/SIDA hotline: 0 800 800 033. Address: 5 Intrarea Mihai Eminescu, Bucharest, Phone & fax: +40 21 210 2077
  • Terre des hommes: This is an HIV NGO working in Romania. Address: 7 rue Zece Mese, sector 2, Bucharest, Phone & fax: +40 21
  • RAA - Romanian Angel Appeal: Address: 52 Rodiei Street, sector 3, code 030 956, Bucharest, Phone: +40 21 323 6868, Fax: +40 21 323 2490
  • ARAS – Romanian Association Against AIDS: This is an NGO that focuses on HIV/AIDS and provides harm reduction services to sex workers. Email: monica.dan@arasnet.ro
  • Carusel Association: They provide harm reduction services to sex workers.

Costs[edit]

Medications & Vaccines[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • If you have a yeast infection, you can tell the pharmacist that you have "candidoză," which is "candidiasis" in Romanian. At pharmacies, you should be able to get Fluconazole or Flucoric, which are common brands of medication to treat yeast infections in Romania.[12]
  • You should be able to get the HPV vaccine in Romania. There has been a nationwide vaccination program since 2010 that targets 12-year olds.[13]
  • It seems like you can get PEP in Romania for a price (we're not sure the cost) -- and, if you're exposed to HIV on the job, you can get PEP free of charge.[14] However, we'll need more information to confirm this. It's recommended that you contact a hospital emergency room for more details.
  • There appears to be no PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) program in Romania, as of March 2017.[15]

Costs[edit]

Menstruation[edit]

Note: In addition to pads and tampons, you can also use menstrual cups and menstrual underwear for your period. To learn more about menstrual cups, click here. To learn more about menstrual underwear, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • You can buy menstrual cups from Romanian online stores. For example, you can buy DivaCup for 225,50 RON (as of March 2017) at Biovea Romania, or you can buy the IrisCup for 104.6 lei from Organik Romania. You can also order brands, such as MoonCup, which can deliver the menstrual cup from the UK to Romania.

Costs[edit]

Gynecological Exams[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

Costs[edit]

Pregnancy[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • Dr Hamid Reza - This ob/gyn was recommended by a Bucharest local who says, "I go to him to Sanador, but he was also in Regina Maria, Medicover, Medlife... he is real expert with gentle personality. I gave birth with using his help."
  • Dr. Marius Romila: This ob/gyn was recommended by a Bucharest local. Call 0721205321. Email: mariusromila@yahoo.com. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drmariusromila/
  • Dr. Madalina Comanescu at the Sanador hospital at Piata Victoriei - Recommended by a Bucharest local
  • Dr. Marian Iliescu from Medlife Hospital - Recommended by a Bucharest local

Costs[edit]

Abortion[edit]

Important Note: There are two main types of abortions: medical (also known as the "abortion pill") and surgical (also known as "in-clinic"). For medical abortions, you take a pill to induce abortion. For surgical abortions, a procedure is performed to induce abortion. For general information about medical and surgical abortions, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In Romania, according to the Penal Code, abortion is legal upon request during the first 14 weeks of pregnancy. After fourteen weeks of pregnancy, abortion is permitted if there is a medical/therapeutic reason for the abortion. While the majority of such abortions are performed within the first 24 weeks of pregnancy, the law allows for abortions to be performed even after 24 weeks for therapeutic reasons "in the interest of the mother or the fetus." For an abortion to be legal, it must be performed at a medical institution by a licensed physician.[16]

Historically, Romanian abortion law has gone through many changes. In 1948, Romania became a communist state -- and, like many other communist states, Romania legalized abortion in 1957. At the time, the level of contraceptive use in Romania was very low, and up to 80% of pregnancies eventually resulted in abortion. Over time, he government grew concerned about dwindling fertility rates, so the state took a natalist approach and criminalized abortion (except for very specific cases) in 1966. As a result, fertility rates grew in Romania, and the government promoted the image of the "superwoman," who managed to develop a large family while also participating in the work force. Under Romania's natalist laws, it was difficult to get a divorce, homosexuality and adultery were criminalized, and the government even fined or penalized women who did not have children. In this environment, a large clandestine abortion industry developed, and many women were subjected to unsafe procedures. Between 1965 and 1989, it's estimated that 9,000 women in Romania died due to botched abortions. These strict policies were finally reversed in 1990, after the fall of the communist government, and abortion is again available upon request in Romania today.[17]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

Costs[edit]

Advocacy & Counseling[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

Costs[edit]

List of Additional Resources[edit]

  • Accept: This is an NGO that focuses on LGBT rights in Romania. They also provide programs related to HIV/AIDS and safe sex. They're the Romanian representative at ILGA-Europe.
  • AnA - The Romanian Society for Feminist Analyses: AnA is a multimedia resource centre on gender issues and women's studies. Address: 24, Ferdinand Blvd., apt. 12, 70313 Bucharest 2,Romania Tel./Fax: +40-1 252 49 59. E-mail: ana@ana.sbnet.ro or cecilia@cepes.ro
  • Maria Magdalena Romania: Sex worker rights group based in Bucharest.
  • Carusel: "Carusel aim to improve the quality of life for drug and alcohol users, sex workers or individuals who have multiple sex partners, persons who live on the streets, socially and economically challenged people and the ones that are at risk of getting sick or facing social exclusion." They have a harm reduction program for sex workers. Email: office@carusel.org.
  • ARIADNA: Association of Art, Press and Business Women: 16 Stirbei Voda Street, apt. 21, et 5, 70733 Bucharest 1, Romania. Tel: +40-1 314 60 14. Tel./Fax: +40-1 312 46 34. E-mail: adam@fx.ro
  • Association Saint Nicholas: Str. Burdujeni 5, bl. A 14, apt.48 , 74634 Bucharest 3, Romania, Tel: 0040 1 644 83 14, Fax: 0040 1 211 49 06
  • Gender and Culture Interdisciplinary Study Group - Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca: Str. Almasului nr. 3, ap. 5, 3400 Cluj-Napoca, Romania. Tel.: +40-64 170 111. Fax: + 40-64 435 428. E-mail: mmudure@lett.ubbcluj.ro
  • Ind. Society for Human Rights - SIRDO, UNHCR: Str. Anghel Saligny Nr. 8, floor 4, Bucharest, Romania
  • Liga Pro Europa - Women's Programme: P-ta Trandafirilor nr. 5, et. 3, P.O. Box 1-154. Tel./Fax: +40-65 21 40 76 or +40-65 21 75 84. E-mail: laura@proeuro.netsoft.ro
  • The National Association of University Women of Romania: Str. Daniceni Nr 8, 71267 Bucharest 1, Romania. Tel: +40-1 617 77 17. Fax: +40-1 222 81 13
  • Network Of East-West Women: Ana Ipatescu Bd. 3, Bucharest. Tel: 40-1-650-3473. Fax: 40-1-312-7053
  • Society for Interbalkan Cooperation of Romanian Women: Calea Dorobanti no. 45, 71143 Bucharest, Romania, Tel: +40-1 211 84 06, Fax: +40-1 210 08 15
  • Study Group of the Problems of the Disabled: Bd. banu Manta Nr. 9, , cam. 178171, Bucharest, Romania. Tel: 0040 1 312 9161. Fax: 0040 1 618 3475
  • Women In Development: 4, Bucur Street, Bucharest, sect. 4, Romania. T: 40-1-330-1275
  • Women's League - Brasov: Str. Paraului 7A, Bloc F14, Apt. 1, 2200 Brasov, Romania. Tel: +40-68 184 906. Fax: +40-68 167 947
  • Women's Association from Romania - Asociatia femeilor din Romania: Calea Victoriei 135, et. 3, cam. 30-31, 70149 Bucharest 3, Romania, Bucharest I, Romania. Tel: +40-1 650 27 95. Fax: +40-1 659 79 31.
  • The Women's National Confederation from Romania: CP 76-135, Bucharest, Romania, Tel: +40-1 312 23 88 , Fax: +40-1 312 23 88
  • The Women's Organizations of Targu Frumos: Str. P. Rares No. 85, bl. 16, Sc.A, Et II, Ap. 9, 6750 Targu Frumos, Romania, Tel. +40-32 710 388. Fax. +40-32 712 204.

References[edit]

  1. Global Oral Contraception Availability
  2. Free the Pill: Where on Earth?
  3. Trends in Contraceptive Use 2015 Report
  4. Abortion in Romania
  5. Sexual behaviour and sexual and reproductive health education: a cross-sectional study in Romania
  6. THE POWER OF TALKING: BREAKING DOWN TABOOS IN ROMANIA
  7. EC Status and Availability: Romania
  8. Princeton EC Website
  9. Princeton EC Website
  10. EC Status and Availability: Romania
  11. ROMANIA - REGULATIONS ON ENTRY, STAY AND RESIDENCE FOR PLHIV
  12. Fluconazole - Brand Names
  13. Romania: Human Papillomavirus and Related Cancers, Fact Sheet 2016
  14. PEP Availability
  15. PrEPWatch World Map
  16. Abortion in Romania
  17. Abortion in Romania