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Budapest

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Hungary / Budapest
Budapest Parlament Building.jpg

OVERVIEW

In Hungary, you can find many health care resources. While you need a prescription for most forms of contraception, you can find birth control pills, shots, implants and rings (i.e. Nuvaring). Condoms are available in pharmacies. You also need a prescription for emergency contraception (the morning after pill), though if you can't access a prescription, you can use regular birth control pills as replacement EC or get an IUD inserted instead. We provide more information in the "Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)" section. Regarding STIs, there are no travel restrictions for short-term visitors, however you may be required to take an HIV test if you plan to stay longer than 3 months. If you test positive, you will not necessarily be expelled from the country. You can find pads, tampons and some menstrual cups (such as MoonCup) in Budapest. If you're a Hungarian citizen or legal Hungarian resident, you can legally obtain an abortion for up to 12 weeks of pregnancy.

Contraception (Birth Control)[edit]

General Note: There are many types of contraceptives, also known as "birth control," including IUDs, oral contraceptives, patches, shots, and condoms, etc. If you would like to view a full list, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In Hungary, you need a prescription to obtain hormonal birth control, such as birth control pills, at pharmacies.[1] [2] However, you can obtain condoms without a prescription.

According to a 2015 report, about 75% of Hungarian women (who are married/in unions and between ages 15 to 49) use any form of contraception, and 8% of the women have unmet family planning needs.[3]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • In Hungary, you can find condoms in pharmacies and no prescription is required.
  • You will need a prescription for birth control pills. Once you have a prescription, you can find phasic, progestin-only and combined birth control pills, with brands coming from Hungary, Germany, France, Netherlands, the UK and USA. Some brands you may see are Anteovin, Belara, Cerazette, Cilest, Continuin, Diane, Femoden, Gracial, Harmonet, Lindynette 20, Lindynette 30, Loette, Marvelon, Meliane, Mercilon, Minulet, Novynette, Qlaira, Regulon, Rigevidon, Rigevidon 21, Tri-Regol, Tri-Regol 21+7, Trinordiol 21, Triodena, Yadine and Yasminelle (21 tablets).
  • You can find the contraceptive ring (Nuvaring) in Hungary.
  • If you want a contraceptive shot/injectable, you can find Depo-Provera SAS 150mg/ml.
  • If you want a contraceptive implant, you can find Implanon (Implants with Etonogestrel 68 mg / Conjugated Estrogens g).

Costs[edit]

Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)[edit]

Important Notes: Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC as soon as possible after unprotected sex. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click here and here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

You need a prescription for emergency contraception (the morning after pill) in Hungary. Even if you're a victim of sexual assault, you must first see a doctor before getting a prescription. There are no age restrictions for purchasing EC.[4] Many other European countries don't require a prescription for EC and, in January 2015, the European Commission approved the over-the-counter sale of ellaOne, a brand of emergency contraception. However, the Hungarian government announced that it would continue to require a prescription for emergency contraception in January 2015. Despite international urging to change these laws (including from CEDAW Committee, the UN expert body on human rights), the Hungarian government has not yet changed its stance on the issue.[5]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • In Hungary, you need a prescription for emergency contraception (the morning after pill). Once you have a prescription, you can find EC in pharmacies, public clinics or emergency rooms. You can get ellaOne (take 1 pill within 120 hours after unprotected sex), which is currently considered the most effective EC on the market. You can also get Escapelle (take 1 pill within 120 hours after unprotected sex) and Rigesoft (take 2 pills within 120 hours after unprotected sex).[6]
  • If you can't access dedicated emergency contraception, you can use regular birth control pills as replacement EC. To do this, you should remember that, in 28-day packs, only the first 21 pills can be used. You can take Ovidon (take 2 pills within 120 hours after unprotected sex and take 2 more pills 12 hours later). You can also take Rigevidon or Rigevidon 21 (take 4 pills within 120 hours after unprotected sex and take 4 more pills 12 hours later).[7]
  • You can also get an IUD to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex. See the "Contraception (Birth Control)" section for details.

Costs[edit]

In 2013, here were the prices - LNG: € 17,93, as of 2013; UPA: € 22.[8]

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs)[edit]

Important Notes - Learn about PEP and PrEP: If you think that you've been recently exposed to HIV (i.e. within 72 hours), seek out PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a month-long treatment to prevent HIV infection after exposure, and it may be available in your city. Take PEP as soon as possible. For more information, click here. If you are at risk of HIV exposure, seek out PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a daily oral pill that can prevent HIV infection before exposure. To learn more about PrEP, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

If you're entering Hungary as a tourist, there are no restrictions based on HIV status, and you won't be asked for a medical certificate in order to enter the country. However, if you're a foreigner and you plan to apply for residency in Hungary, you will be asked to declare if you're infected with tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS, syphilis, typhus, paratyphus or hepatitis B. If you're a citizen of the European Economic Area (EEA), you'll also be asked to make this declaration. Furthermore, in order to receive a residency permit, you will probably need to take an HIV test. Currently, undocumented immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers also receive mandatory HIV tests in Hungary. If you're a foreigner applying for residency and you test positive for HIV, you will not be automatically expelled from Hungary. Rather, the Hungarian government will assess your stability (i.e. if you have valid insurance at home). According to HIVTravel, "if they have a valid insurance at home, the Hungarian Social Security Fund may be willing to negotiate about providing services to the person to the account of their original insurance, provided that they have taxable income in Hungary and pay social security contribution."[9]

Testing Facilities[edit]

  • STD Clinic at Semmelweis University: Call +36-1-459-1500, extension 55773, Monday through Thursday between 13:00 and 14:30 to schedule an appointment.
  • Some dermatology offices/clinics may be able to give you a test, such as Dermart Buda Private Clinic or Róbert Rendelőintézet (Madarasz Viktor u 49., Budapest, 112). You should call to confirm.[10]

Support[edit]

Costs[edit]

Medications & Vaccines[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • To say "yeast infection" in Hungarian, you can say "gombás fertőzés."
  • In Hungary, there is a nationwide HPV vaccination program, which targets 12 year olds.s[11] You can also get the HPV vaccine in clinics or hospitals.
  • There appears to be no Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) available in Hungary, as of February 2017.[12]

Costs[edit]

Menstruation[edit]

Note: In addition to pads and tampons, you can also use menstrual cups and menstrual underwear for your period. To learn more about menstrual cups, click here. To learn more about menstrual underwear, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

In Hungary, you can find pads and tampons and stores. If you're looking for tampons, you may be more likely to find tampons without applicators (like OB). If you're looking for menstrual cups, you may be able to find MoonCups at Zöld Polc webáruház (1118 Budapest, Budaörsi út 131/A; Tel: +36-20-265-6777) or Bionom Válogatott Termékek Kft. (1065 Budapest, Nagymező utca 25., 11-es kapucsengő, II.em.1.; Tel: +36 70 704 8843).

Costs[edit]

Gynecological Exams[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

Costs[edit]

Pregnancy[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • "The pregnancy of my wife four our three girls has been done in Rozsakert. We were very happy with their services. It s a private clinic." - Budapest local
  • "I have been on a premium annual scheme with Firstmed ( very reasonably priced) for several years, and I am very satisfied with their overall service! Have been to many specialists, but not Ob." - Budapest local

Costs[edit]

Abortion[edit]

Important Note: There are two main types of abortions: medical (also known as the "abortion pill") and surgical (also known as "in-clinic"). For medical abortions, you take a pill to induce abortion. For surgical abortions, a procedure is performed to induce abortion. For general information about medical and surgical abortions, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

Important Note: Foreigners can only receive abortions in Hungary if they have a valid residence permit (that is over 2 months old).[13]

Since 1953, abortion has been legal in Hungary.[14] For the first twelve weeks of pregnancy, all reasons for abortion, including to save the life of the woman, to preserve physical health, to preserve mental health, rape or incest, risk of fetal impairment, economic or social reasons or upon the request of the pregnant woman, are permitted.[15] Note that the age of pregnancy is determined based on the last menstrual cycle (not date of conception).[16] While a woman must technically receive the approval of her abortion from a committee, this request has reportedly become a mere formality. Furthermore, if a woman is under 12 weeks pregnant and the pregnancy causes a "grave crisis situation" for the woman, the committee is obligated to accept the request. According to the Ministry of Health, a "grave crisis situation" is defined as " "when it causes bodily or mental impairment, or a socially intolerable situation."[17]

Before a woman receives an abortion, she must reportedly make two visits to a Family Planning office (Családvédelmi Szolgálat) to learn about adoption and state support. There must be a gap of at least three days before appointments.[18] For more details about the abortion process, see the section below ("What To Get & Where To Get It").

It should be noted that, according to the new Hungarian Constitution (enacted in 2011), human life begins at birth. Moreover, in 1992, Act LXXIX of 1992 on the protection of fetal life stated that "fetal life, which starts with conception, deserves respect and protection" and "the termination of pregnancies is not a means of family planning and birth control."[19] However, the government has not made changes to its abortion policies based on these provisions.[20]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • You can only legally receive an abortion in Hungary if you're a citizen or have legal residency (for at least 2 months).[21]
  • If you're a citizen or legal resident of Hungary, you can legally obtain an abortion (for any reason) for up to 12 weeks of pregnancy. However, you must go through some steps before obtaining the abortion. Here are the steps: You must visit a gynecologist to receive a note that confirms the age of the pregnancy. Then, you'll need to visit a social worker at a district Family Planning/Welfare office (Családvédelmi Szolgálat). You should bring the note from the gynecologist, a picture ID and your identification papers/permit). The social worker may give you information on state support and adoption options. Then, you must visit the office again at least 72 hours (3 days) after the first appointment. In total, you must visit the social worker twice. Once you have completed these steps, you can make an appointment for the abortion procedure at a hospital. You should bring the note from the gynecologist, the referral from the Family Planning/Welfare office, your picture ID and any identification/residency papers.[22]
  • We know that surgical abortion (vacuum aspiration) is available in Hungary, and you can choose between local or general anesthesia. As of 2013, medical abortion ("the abortion pill") was not a registered option, but we're not sure if this has changed.[23] [24]

Costs[edit]

The cost of an abortion will depend on whether you have Hungarian health insurance, private insurance or no insurance. If you have Hungarian health insurance, and if you go to a public clinic, you should need to pay around HUF 30,000, as of 2013. However, if you don't have Hungarian health insurance (because you're uninsured or have private insurance), you'll probably need to pay out-of-pocket. At public clinics, you may need to pay around HUF 90,000 (gynecology visit for HUF 10,000 and the procedure for HUF 80,000), as of 2013. At private clinics, you may need to pay around HUF 200,000 to 300,000 as of 2013. The private clinics tend to cater to foreigners.[25]

Advocacy & Counseling[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • Háttér Support Society for LGBT People in Hungary: This LGBTQI resource provides a helpline, HIV/AIDS program, legal support and other services. Website is in English and Hungarian. "Háttér Society is one of the largest and most active LGBTQI organizations in Hungary. Founded in 1995, its aims are to protect the human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBTQI) people and to reduce the fear and ignorance about homosexuality through better integration of LGBTQI people into society at large." Address: H-1132 Budapest, Csanády u. 4/B., Hungary, Phone: +36 1 238 0046, +36 1 329 2670. Fax: +36 1 799 8418. Email: hatter@hatter.hu.

Costs[edit]

List of Additional Resources[edit]

  • Equaldex Hungary: This website provides information about LGBTQ rights and laws in Hungary. Note that homosexuality is legal and it is legal to change gender.
  • Hungarian LGBT Alliance: This is an umbrella group for LGBT organizations in Hungary and it's also a member of ILGA-Europe.
  • Labrisz Lesbian Association: This is a website for lesbian, bisexual and queer women, providing support, information and events.
  • Klit - Queer Feminist Activist and Community Space: "Our approach to the elimination of violence against women and trans* aims at fighting misogyny, transphobia and homophobia from their roots."
  • Association of Hungarian Sex Workers: Founded in 2000 after prostitution became legal in Hungary. Provides emergency 24-hour hotline, information and prevention campaigns, condom distribution, legal aid service, social help, job training for sex workers who want to quit, etc.
  • Hungarian Feminists: c/o Eniko Bollobas, Orszaghaz u. 25. , H-1014 Hungary, Tel: 36-1-175 4807.
  • Network Women's Program - Open Society Institute: Nador u. 11., 1051 Budapest, Hungary, Tel: (361) 327 3139, Fax: (361) 327 3864, E-mail: womenpro@osi.hu
  • Program on Gender & Culture - Central European University: Nador u.9, Budapest, 1051-H, Hungary, Fax 36-1-327-3001
  • Feminist Network, Szerb utca 8, , 1056 Budapest, Hungary
  • Association of Hungarian Women: Budapest, Andrassy ut 124, H-1062, Hungary, Tel: 361-131 9734 or 00361 13 19 1734, Fax: 361-131 9734 or 00361 13 19 1734
  • National Council Of Hungarian Women (Magyar Nok Orszagos Tanacs): Kulugyi Osztaly, Nepkoztarsasag utja 124, Budapest VI, 1062 Hungary, Tel: 36-1-125 0 71, Tel / Fax: 36 1 1319734, E-mail: Hung_Wom_Assoc@com.kibernet.hu

References[edit]

  1. Global Oral Contraception Availability
  2. Free the Pill: Where on Earth?
  3. Trends in Contraceptive Use 2015 Report
  4. EC Status and Availability: Hungary
  5. Dispatches: Hungary Tells Women to Wait
  6. Princeton EC Website
  7. Princeton EC Website
  8. EC Status and Availability: Hungary
  9. HUNGARY - REGULATIONS ON ENTRY, STAY AND RESIDENCE FOR PLHIV
  10. Sexually Transmitted Diseases Testing Budapest
  11. [http://www.hpvcentre.net/statistics/reports/HUN_FS.pdf Hungary Human Papillomavirus and Related Cancers, Fact Sheet 2016]
  12. PrEPWatch World Map
  13. Termination of Pregnancy and Abortion in Hungary
  14. Abortion in Hungary
  15. UN Report: Abortion Laws
  16. Having an Abortion in Hungary
  17. Abortion in Hungary
  18. Termination of Pregnancy and Abortion in Hungary
  19. World Abortion Laws
  20. Abortion in Hungary
  21. Having an Abortion in Hungary
  22. Having an Abortion in Hungary
  23. Having an Abortion in Hungary
  24. Termination of Pregnancy and Abortion in Hungary
  25. Abortion in Hungary