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Canberra

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OVERVIEW

Contraception (Birth Control)[edit | edit source]

General Note: There are many types of contraceptives, also known as "birth control," including IUDs, oral contraceptives, patches, shots, and condoms, etc. If you would like to view a full list, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

Access to contraception is freely available. Hormonal contraception requires a prescription from a doctor, but getting a script filled at a chemist won't earn you a second glance. If you feel sensitive to being judged visit a chemist in the city or the inner north where folks tend to be more open minded. There is very little stigma around asking a doctor for a prescription for contraception, or information on other types of contraception.

There is an incredibly wide range of contraceptives offered, from hormonal pills to injectables and IUDs, and practically every known contraceptive is available in Australia. It is estimated that 67%-70% of Australian women of fertility age (who are married or in unions) use some form of contraception,[1] without about 24% of Australian women on oral contraceptives.

Note: Australian women who believe they may have been adversely affected by Yaz or Yasmin can register for a potential class action suite: http://tgb.com.au/enquire/class-action/

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Condoms can be purchased from a supermarket, chemist, convenience store or petrol station. Bigger supermarkets have a 'self checkout option if you are feeling the need to be private. Hormonal contraception such as the pill requires consultation with a doctor ( also known as a General Practitioner or GP). Some doctors offer 'bulk billing' - free consultations - if you have a medicare card. Sexual Health and Family Planning have doctors who are very knowledgeable about contraception, but the wait times are often several weeks.

Costs[edit | edit source]

Condoms from $5 for 10 pack or free from Sexual Heal and Family Planning

The Pill - approximtely $60 for a doctor's consolation or free with medicare from a bulk billing doctor plus from $10 - $30 per month for the medication. Implanon - approximately $60 for a doctor's consolation or free with medicare from a bulk billing doctor plus $30 for the medication. IUD approximately $60 for a doctor's consolation or free with medicare from a bulk billing doctor plus $40 for the medication.

Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)[edit | edit source]

Important Notes: Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC as soon as possible after unprotected sex. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click here and here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

Emergency contraception is legal in Canberra. You may be given a talking to from the pharmacist when purchasing emergency contraception. If you feel sensitive to being judged visit a chemist in the city or the inner north where folks tend to be more open minded.

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Note: The longest-lasting EC is currently ellaOne. It lasts up to 5 days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Check to see if your country carries ellaOne. If your country doesn't carry ellaOne, copper IUDs may also prevent pregnancy up to 5 days after unprotected sex. If none of these options are available, and it's been over 3 days since you had unprotected sex, you can still take EC, which may work up to 5 days. Note that EC pills are not 100% effective and should be taken as soon as possible.

Any pharmacist will stock EC. You will need to briefly consult with the pharmacist, they should take you into a private space and ask you a few questions to make sure the medication is right for you. They might also give you The Talk about using condoms or the pill in future. Some pharmacists are open till 11pm, and some are open on Sundays. Useful list here.

Costs[edit | edit source]

Varies - between $20 and $50.

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs)[edit | edit source]

Important Notes - Learn about PEP and PrEP: If you think that you've been recently exposed to HIV (i.e. within 72 hours), seek out PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a month-long treatment to prevent HIV infection after exposure, and it may be available in your city. Take PEP as soon as possible. For more information, click here. If you are at risk of HIV exposure, seek out PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a daily oral pill that can prevent HIV infection before exposure. To learn more about PrEP, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

Testing and information around STIs is legal, reliable and discrete. Some doctors and health professionals may hold conservative views, but on the whole you'll be OK.

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Testing Facilities[edit | edit source]

Any doctor (GP) can refer you to a pathology centre, where blood or other samples are collected and sent off for testing. The results are sent to your doctor who will contact you to let you know the results. Some doctors do not like to give results over the phone and will require you to come in for another visit. It is best to confirm this process with your doctor when they are ordering the tests. GPs usually operate within business hours 9-5 Monday to Friday. Pathology centres can be found at most local shopping centres and often have extended opening hours to allow people to visit before or after work. Pathology staff and usually friendly, professional and reassuring.

Support[edit | edit source]

Sexual Health and Family Planning can offer information and support, as well as running its own clinic for consolation and testing around STIs. https://www.shfpact.org.au/ Sexual Health and Family Planning]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Approximately $60 for a doctor's consolation or free with medicare from a bulk billing doctor. Pathology tests are typically free with a Medicare card.

Medications & Vaccines[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Chemists stock period pain medication such as iboprofen and naprogesics. Some of this medication is 'over the counter' - ie you'll have to ask the pharmicist to give it to you.

Costs[edit | edit source]

Menstruation[edit | edit source]

Note: In addition to pads and tampons, you can also use menstrual cups and menstrual underwear for your period. To learn more about menstrual cups, click here. To learn more about menstrual underwear, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

There is low social stigma around menstruation.

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Pads and tampons available from supermarkets, chemists, convenience stores and petrol stations. Bigger supermarkets have a 'self checkout option if you are feeling the need to be private. Chemist warehouse stores and The Food Coop stock menstrual cups.


Costs[edit | edit source]

from $5 for pads and tampons From $50 for menstrual cup that you can use for the rest of your life (cheeper online)

Gynecological Exams[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Pregnancy[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

It is legal to be pregnant, married or unmarried. There is low social stigma around pregnancy.

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Pregnancy test kits available from supermarkets and chemists. $15 approx.

Costs[edit | edit source]

Having a baby is hella expensive hey.

Abortion[edit | edit source]

Important Note: There are two main types of abortions: medical (also known as the "abortion pill") and surgical (also known as "in-clinic"). For medical abortions, you take a pill to induce abortion. For surgical abortions, a procedure is performed to induce abortion. For general information about medical and surgical abortions, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

There is mild social stigma around abortion. Abortion is legal in Canberra.

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Marie Stopes clinic in the city centre. For surgical and medical abortions.

Or via telephone consolation for medical abortions. [The Tabbot Foundation https://www.tabbot.com.au/]

Tabbot foundation are effective, legal and safe. After a consolation with a doctor and a psychologist, they will mail the abortion drugs to you. You can then take them at home, with telephone support from Tabbot foundation if you need it. Because the law in Canberra requires that abortion drugs be administered in a clinic, you will pick up the drugs from nearby Queanbeyan, which is in New South Wales. Queanbeyan is 30 minutes by car. You can also reach Queanbeyan by bus. Although this sounds dangerous or illegal, it isn't. You will be directed to swallow the abortion pill in Queanbeyan, but you will not feel the effects of the pill until hours later. Enough time to travel back home, or to where you are staying.

Costs[edit | edit source]

Tabbot foundation: With a valid Medicare Card $250, If you do not have a Medicare Card $600

Marie Stopes Clinic: from $440


Advocacy & Counseling[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

List of Additional Resources[edit | edit source]

References[edit | edit source]