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Czech Republic

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OVERVIEW

In the Czech Republic, there are many birth control options, such as pills, shot, implants and IUDs, but you will need a prescription before obtaining them. Condoms are easy to find and no prescription is required. Emergency contraception (the morning after pill) can be purchased without a prescription, and ellaOne (the most effective EC on the market) is also available. While there are many places to get an STD/STI test, and there are also no residency travel restrictions tied to STI status, there currently seems to be no PrEP available in the Czech Republic. You can get the HPV vaccine and most other vaccines or medications. There is a 28-week maternity leave policy for women and the government seems to be expanding its paternity leave policy as well. Abortion is fully legal in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy and, based on medical conditions or the condition of the fetus, it can sometimes be performed later as well. If you don't have legal residency or citizenship in the Czech Republic, you may have difficulty obtaining an abortion (this is information that we're still investigating).

Contraception (Birth Control)[edit]

General Note: There are many types of contraceptives, also known as "birth control," including IUDs, oral contraceptives, patches, shots, and condoms, etc. If you would like to view a full list, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In the Czech Republic, you need a prescription to obtain birth control. According to a 2015 report, 77.8% of Czech women (who are in unions or marriages) use some form of contraception. The most common forms of contraception were the pill (48.4%), male condoms (11.7%) and withdrawal (6.9%).[1]

For birth control options, like IUDs, shots and implants, you typically visit an obstetrician/gynecologist (not a General Practitioner) in the Czech Republic.

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • If you want condoms, they can be purchased in pharmacies, stores and vending machines in bars/pubs.
  • If you want birth control pills, they can be purchased in pharmacies once you have a prescription.
  • For local recommendations on where to get birth control shots, implants, IUDs, etc., please visit the city pages, like the Prague page.

Costs[edit]

Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)[edit]

Important Notes: Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC as soon as possible after unprotected sex. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click here and here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In the Czech Republic, you can purchase emergency contraceptive pills (the morning after pill) without a prescription.

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • In the Czech Republic, you can purchase emergency contraception (the morning after pill) without a prescription at pharmacies. If you would like to purchase anti-progestin EC, there's ellaOne (take 1 pill within 120 hours after unprotected sex). Currently, ellaOne is considered the most effective EC on the market. Here's the a link to the Czech ellaOne website. You can also find Escapelle (take 1 pill within 120 hours after unprotected sex) or Postinor-2 (take 2 pills within 120 hours after unprotected sex).[2]
  • If you can't access dedicated emergency contraception, you can use regular birth control pills as replacement EC. To do this, you need o remember that, in 28-day packs, only the first 21 pills can be used. You can then find Microgynon or Minisiston. For either of these brands, you should take 4 pills within 120 hours after unprotected sex and take 4 more pills 12 hours later.[3]
  • You can also get an IUD as a way to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex. Check out the "Contraception (Birth Control)" section for details.

Costs[edit]

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs)[edit]

Important Notes - Learn about PEP and PrEP: If you think that you've been recently exposed to HIV (i.e. within 72 hours), seek out PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a month-long treatment to prevent HIV infection after exposure, and it may be available in your city. Take PEP as soon as possible. For more information, click here. If you are at risk of HIV exposure, seek out PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a daily oral pill that can prevent HIV infection before exposure. To learn more about PrEP, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In the Czech Republic, there are no travel or residency restrictions based on STI status. You will not be asked for a medical certificate in order to enter the country.

Testing Facilities[edit]

Note: If you're pregnant or if you donate blood, you can get a free HIV test.

  • For local recommendations, please visit the city pages, like the Prague page.

Support[edit]

Costs[edit]

If you have Czech health insurance, there are many clinics that can test you for free. If you don't have insurance, you can expect to pay around 2000 CZK for a series of tests. Another local reports the following costs when she recently had tests: 1000 Kc for the visit, 350 for sampling, 350 each for syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia testing and 440 for HIV test.

Medications & Vaccines[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • In the Czech Republic, there has been a nationwide HPV vaccination program in place since 2012.[4]
  • There is no national PrEP program in the Czech Republic. According to a 2016 report, "In the Czech Republic, HIV doctors are apparently unwilling to prescribe because they do not support the concept of PiEi. Some people noted that an EMA ruling in favour of Truvada® as PrEP may make an important difference for HIV physicians in this regard."[5]

Costs[edit]

Menstruation[edit]

Note: In addition to pads and tampons, you can also use menstrual cups and menstrual underwear for your period. To learn more about menstrual cups, click here. To learn more about menstrual underwear, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

None

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • You can find pads and tampons in grocery stores, corner stores and pharmacies. While many tampons sold in the Czech Republic don't have applicators (like OB tampons), you should also be able to find tampons with applicators.
  • You can get menstrual cups from DM or from many pharmacies. Menstrual cups and sponges can also purchased online from Biooo, a Czech online retailer. Some brands, like LadyCup, have a Czech website. There is also Yuuki, a menstrual cup made in the Czech Republic. MoonCup, which is made in the UK, can supposedly be found at Centrum laserove estetiky a.s. (Římská 16, Vinohrady, Praha 2). DivaCup, which if made in the USA, can be purchased from Mujkalisek (Tel: +42 777 246 133, contact: Nikola Zavadova, info@mujkalisek.cz). There are also many online stores that cater to Czech customers that sell menstrual cups, such as LadyTeen, Primisima, Brana K Detem, BeGreen, Kalisek (sells Lunette, LadyGel and other products), Krasa.cz, Vitamina.cz, etc.

Costs[edit]

Gynecological Exams[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

Women's Clinics & Health Centers[edit]

  • For local recommendations, please visit the city pages, like the Prague page.

Gynecologists[edit]

  • For local recommendations, please visit the city pages, like the Prague page.

Costs[edit]

Pregnancy[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In the Czech Republic, female employees can receive 28 weeks of maternity leave (mateřská dovolená) with 70% of their salary covered. After 7 weeks of maternity leave, fathers can take over the responsibilities (if a written agreement is signed) and take paternity leave. In late 2016, the Czech government sought to expand paternity leave, and it may now pass a proposal that expands paternity leave for workers in the country.[6]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • For local recommendations, please visit the city pages, like the Prague page.

Costs[edit]

Abortion[edit]

Important Note: There are two main types of abortions: medical (also known as the "abortion pill") and surgical (also known as "in-clinic"). For medical abortions, you take a pill to induce abortion. For surgical abortions, a procedure is performed to induce abortion. For general information about medical and surgical abortions, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

In the Czech Republic, abortion is legal for up to 12 week of pregnancy. If there are medical reasons, abortion is legal for up to 24 weeks of pregnancy. If there is a serious problem with the fetus, abortion is legal at any point.[7] Since June 2014, if a woman is up to seven weeks pregnant, she can purchase RU-486 (the abortion pill) at pharmacies after she has received a prescription at a specialized gynecological clinic in a hospital.[8] For an abortion to be legally performed, the woman must submit a written request. If a gynecologist determines that the abortion would be detrimental the woman's health, the gynecologist can deny the request. Generally, Czech abortion law is based on the Law on Abortion of October 20, 1986 and the Notification of the Ministry of Health of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic of November 7, 1986 (last amended September 8, 1992) on Implementation of the Law on Abortion.[9]

The Czech population seems to generally be in favor of abortion legality. According to a 2007 poll, 72% of Czech people thought that abortion should be allowed "at the request of a woman." In 2013 Pew Research Survey, 19% of Czech respondents found abortion to be morally objectionable.[10]

Important Note: If you're not a legal resident or citizen of the Czech Republic, it appears that you cannot obtain a legal abortion. We haven't 100% confirmed this, but we've read about accounts of non-resident women (who requested abortion services) being turned away from Czech clinics, and there seems to be evidence that a Soviet-era law (which implemented this restriction) is still in place. There may be some providers who secretly provide abortions to non-residents, but they may not be safe since they're not legally regulated. If you're not a resident or citizen, you may want to consider getting an abortion outside of the Czech Republic.

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

  • For local recommendations, please visit the city pages, like the Prague page.

Costs[edit]

Since 1993, abortions for non-medical reasons are not covered by Czech health insurance. In 2014, RU-486 (the abortion pill) cost around 3,500 CZK. If you do have a medical reason for obtaining an abortion and you're covered by Czech health insurance, it's recommended that you contact your insurance providers to learn more details.

Advocacy & Counseling[edit]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit]

Costs[edit]

List of Additional Resources[edit]

  • Czech Women's Lobby: "Czech Women’s Lobby (CWL) is a network of 30 non-profit organisations promoting women’s rights in the Czech Republic. It is also a member of the European Women’s Lobby, joining women’s and gender organisations in the European Union and cooperating with European institutions." Email: info@czlobby.cz.
  • ProFem: "ProFem mission is to work on improving the situation of domestic violence and other forms of violence, especially against women, through lobbying, education, publications and direct support to people at risk of domestic violence or other forms of violence."
  • Prague Pride: "Exhibitions, concerts, workshops, theater, film, lectures, discussions, parties, parties, parties..."
  • International Women's Association of Prague: "The International Women’s Association of Prague (IWAP) is an independent, non-political, non-profit organization run voluntarily by its members. Our members range in age from 23 to 93 with many being Czech citizens, but the majority of our members are from the expat community in Prague and approximately 35 different countries." Phone: +420 721 946 186. Email: office.iwap@gmail.com
  • Gender Studies, o.p.s.: "Gender Studies, o.p.s. is a non-governmental non-profit organisation founded in 1991. It is an information, education and consulting centre on gender equality and the position of men and women in the society."
  • National Contact Centre for Gender & Science: "Established in 2001, the National Contact Centre for Gender & Science (originally "for women and science") contributes to building gender equality in science and research."
  • Czech Center for Human Rights and Democratization: "CCHRD is an independent academic institution analysing human rights from social science and international law perspective. CCHRD organizes conferences, issues a monthly bulletin and informs about human rights in the Czech Republic as well as in Europe."

References[edit]

  1. Trends in Contraceptive Use Worldwide: 2015
  2. Princeton EC Website
  3. Princeton EC Website
  4. [https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/12iZNtCRtAyt7R0HJQYl0xyRsrfCdS9JpCjTNOsGxsJs/edit Czech Republic Human Papillomavirus and Related Cancers, Fact Sheet 2016]
  5. PrEP Access in Europe
  6. Czech Government Approves Paternity Leave
  7. Abortion in the Czech Republic
  8. Controversial Abortion Pill Goes on Sale in Czech
  9. Abortion Legislation in Europe
  10. Abortion in the Czech Republic