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Kingston

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Kingston street, Jamaica.jpg

OVERVIEW

Contraception (Birth Control)[edit | edit source]

General Note: There are many types of contraceptives, also known as "birth control," including IUDs, oral contraceptives, patches, shots, and condoms, etc. If you would like to view a full list, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

In Jamaica, you can purchase condoms and birth control pills at pharmacies without a prescription. You may first need to participate in a basic screening with a pharmacist before you can obtain birth control pills.<[1] [2] For other forms of birth control, such as implants, injectables, and IUDs, you may need to directly visit a hospital or clinic to obtain them.

In 2015, it was found that about 72% of Jamaican women (who were married/in unions and between ages 15-49) used any form of contraception, including traditional methods. This was higher than the Caribbean average (around 62% of Caribbean women used any form of contraception). About 10% of Jamaican women had unmet family planning needs, which was lower than the Caribbean average (about 16% of women had unmet family planning needs. Furthermore, Jamaican women tended to use modern contraceptive methods at higher rates than Caribbean women on average, with 83% of women's demand for family planning satisfied by modern methods (compared to the 75% Caribbean average).[3]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Emergency Contraception (Morning After Pill)[edit | edit source]

Important Notes: Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC as soon as possible after unprotected sex. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click here and here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

In Jamaica, you can purchase emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) from a pharmacist. No prescription is required.

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

  • In Jamaica, you can purchase emergency contraceptive pills (morning after pills) from a pharmacist. No prescription is required. You can find morning after pills sold in pharmacies, clinics, and programs that are associated with the International Planned Parenthood Foundation (IPPF). Some brands you may see are Postinor 2 SD, Postinor-2, Pregnon, and Pregnon 1.5.[4]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs)[edit | edit source]

Important Notes - Learn about PEP and PrEP: If you think that you've been recently exposed to HIV (i.e. within 72 hours), seek out PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a month-long treatment to prevent HIV infection after exposure, and it may be available in your city. Take PEP as soon as possible. For more information, click here. If you are at risk of HIV exposure, seek out PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a daily oral pill that can prevent HIV infection before exposure. To learn more about PrEP, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Testing Facilities[edit | edit source]

Support[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Medications & Vaccines[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Menstruation[edit | edit source]

Note: In addition to pads and tampons, you can also use menstrual cups and menstrual underwear for your period. To learn more about menstrual cups, click here. To learn more about menstrual underwear, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Gynecological Exams[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Pregnancy[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Abortion[edit | edit source]

Important Note: There are two main types of abortions: medical (also known as the "abortion pill") and surgical (also known as "in-clinic"). For medical abortions, you take a pill to induce abortion. For surgical abortions, a procedure is performed to induce abortion. For general information about medical and surgical abortions, click here.

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

Advocacy & Counseling[edit | edit source]

Laws & Social Stigmas[edit | edit source]

What to Get & Where to Get It[edit | edit source]

Costs[edit | edit source]

List of Additional Resources[edit | edit source]

  • Ministry of Health
  • Jamaica Family Planning Association (FAMPLAN): "FAMPLAN has been a pioneer in contraceptive services in Jamaica since 1957. Today, it continues to meet the demand for comprehensive sexual and reproductive health services, particularly for vulnerable communities and young people." This is an affiliate of the International Planned Parenthood Federation. Head Office :14 King Street P.O. Box 92 St. Ann’s Bay St. Ann Jamaica (972-2515 ( famplanjamaica@gmail.com); Lenworth Jacobs Clinic : 65 East Street Kingston (922-8724)
  • Equaldex - Jamaica: This website provides information on LGBTQ rights and laws in Jamaica. It is important to understand that homosexuality is illegal in Jamaica, as of March 2019.

References[edit | edit source]