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[[File:Flag of Canada.svg.png|400px | thumb|right|]]
 
[[File:Flag of Canada.svg.png|400px | thumb|right|]]
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'''OVERVIEW'''  
 
'''OVERVIEW'''  
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In Canada, you will find an incredible range of health care options. Contraceptive methods, including condoms, pills, patches, shots, etc, are widely available. While contraceptives are not subsidized by the Canadian health care system for all people, you can find lower-cost pills and IUDs (including insertion) at public sexual health clinics. You can purchase emergency contraception ("the morning after pill") at pharmacies or obtain it at sexual health clinics. There are no formal age restrictions but pharmacists can refuse to dispense EC to people who do not seem "mature." There are many public sexual health clinics that offer STI tests. While some only cover HIV, other clinics can test for a range of STIs, especially if you make an appointment rather than dropping in. There is an HPV vaccination program in place. You can access Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP). Regarding abortions, they are legal and there are no formal restrictions. If you're not a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, you can expect to pay $300-$900 for the procedure, but there are some financial assistance resources available.
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In Canada, you will find an incredible range of health care options. Contraceptive methods, including condoms, pills, patches, shots, etc, are widely available. While contraceptives are not subsidized by the Canadian health care system for all people, you can find lower-cost pills and IUDs (including insertion) at public sexual health clinics. You can purchase emergency contraception ("the morning after pill") at pharmacies or obtain it at sexual health clinics. There are no formal age restrictions but pharmacists can refuse to dispense EC to people who do not seem "mature." There are many public sexual health clinics that offer STI tests. While some only cover HIV, other clinics can test for a range of STIs, especially if you make an appointment rather than dropping in. There is an HPV vaccination program in place. You can access Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP). Regarding abortions, they are legal and there are no formal restrictions. If you're not a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, you can expect to pay $300-$900 for the procedure, but there are some financial assistance resources available.  
    
==Contraception (Birth Control)==
 
==Contraception (Birth Control)==
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===Laws & Social Stigmas===
 
===Laws & Social Stigmas===
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In Canada, emergency contraception (also known as "the morning after pill") is available over the counter. They can be found in public sector hospitals and pharmacies.  
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In Canada, emergency contraception (also known as "the morning after pill") is available over the counter. They can be found in public sector hospitals and pharmacies.
    
There are some age restrictions when purchasing EC. As reported by the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception, " In May 2008, the National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities (NAPRA) recommended full OTC access for the LNG regimen with no age restriction. This recommendation is being applied Under Common Law; however, pharmacists have the discretion to restrict sale of EC if a woman does not appear mature. All provinces follow Common Law with the exception of Quebec, which follows Civil Code, and Saskatchewan."<ref>[http://www.cecinfo.org/country-by-country-information/status-availability-database/countries/canada/ EC Status and Availability: Canada]</ref>
 
There are some age restrictions when purchasing EC. As reported by the International Consortium for Emergency Contraception, " In May 2008, the National Association of Pharmacy Regulatory Authorities (NAPRA) recommended full OTC access for the LNG regimen with no age restriction. This recommendation is being applied Under Common Law; however, pharmacists have the discretion to restrict sale of EC if a woman does not appear mature. All provinces follow Common Law with the exception of Quebec, which follows Civil Code, and Saskatchewan."<ref>[http://www.cecinfo.org/country-by-country-information/status-availability-database/countries/canada/ EC Status and Availability: Canada]</ref>
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