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In 2012, President Pak Geun-Hye and his conservative government announced that the Korean Food & Drug Administration was considering reclassification of birth control pills, which would make the pills prescription-only. This caused public outrage and wide online discussion of the issue. Three months later, the proposal was dropped. It was decided to put the reclassification on hold for three years -- and, to this day, it seems to remain on hold. As reported in Korea Bang, "Asides from the 'woman’s right to choose' argument, one of the reasons Korean women get upset over the issue is perhaps cultural: unmarried Korean women rarely visit a gynaecologist. Even when seriously ill, a visit to a gynaecology clinic would be reluctant for fear of the disapproving stares around them. That’s not to mention the social pressure on Korean women to remain sexually naïve."<ref>[http://www.koreabang.com/2012/stories/law-on-contraceptive-pill-changes.html Law on Contraceptive Pill Changes]</ref>
 
In 2012, President Pak Geun-Hye and his conservative government announced that the Korean Food & Drug Administration was considering reclassification of birth control pills, which would make the pills prescription-only. This caused public outrage and wide online discussion of the issue. Three months later, the proposal was dropped. It was decided to put the reclassification on hold for three years -- and, to this day, it seems to remain on hold. As reported in Korea Bang, "Asides from the 'woman’s right to choose' argument, one of the reasons Korean women get upset over the issue is perhaps cultural: unmarried Korean women rarely visit a gynaecologist. Even when seriously ill, a visit to a gynaecology clinic would be reluctant for fear of the disapproving stares around them. That’s not to mention the social pressure on Korean women to remain sexually naïve."<ref>[http://www.koreabang.com/2012/stories/law-on-contraceptive-pill-changes.html Law on Contraceptive Pill Changes]</ref>
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According to a 2015 UN report, it was found that 78.7% of South Korean women (who were married/in unions and of reproductive age) used some form contraception. The most common methods were condoms (23.9%), male sterilization (16.5%), IUDs (12.6%), the rhythm method (9.7%) and female sterilization (5.8%).<ref>[http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/family/trendsContraceptiveUse2015Report.pdf Trends in Contraceptive Use 2015]</ref> Meanwhile, the usage of birth control pills by South Korean was very low, with estimates ranging between 2%<ref>[http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/family/trendsContraceptiveUse2015Report.pdf Trends in Contraceptive Use 2015]</ref> and 2.8%.<ref>[http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20120607000915 Korean Herald])</ref> Many men and women also underwent the forced sterilization programs of the 1970s and 1980s.<ref>[https://thegrandnarrative.com/2012/02/16/korean-family-planning/ Learning From Korean Family Planning Advertisements of the 1960s-1980s]</ref>
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According to a 2015 UN report, it was found that 78.7% of South Korean women (who were married/in unions and of reproductive age) used some form contraception. The most common methods were condoms (23.9%), male sterilization (16.5%), IUDs (12.6%), the rhythm method (9.7%) and female sterilization (5.8%).<ref name="un_contraceptivesreport2015">[http://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/family/trendsContraceptiveUse2015Report.pdf Trends in Contraceptive Use 2015]</ref> Meanwhile, the usage of birth control pills by South Korean was very low, with estimates ranging between 2%<ref name="un_contraceptivesreport2015" /> and 2.8%.<ref>[http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20120607000915 Korean Herald])</ref> Many men and women also underwent the forced sterilization programs of the 1970s and 1980s.<ref>[https://thegrandnarrative.com/2012/02/16/korean-family-planning/ Learning From Korean Family Planning Advertisements of the 1960s-1980s]</ref>
    
===What to Get & Where to Get It===
 
===What to Get & Where to Get It===
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To get an EC prescription, you will need to go to a doctor. It is recommended to visit a women's clinic for the prescription rather than a hospital. You will find it especially difficult to secure an EC prescription at a Christian hospital. When you are seeking EC, it is customary that the doctor will ask some questions about your cycle, last period, etc. After they have written a prescription, you can bring it to a pharmacy ("yak-guk" in Korean).
 
To get an EC prescription, you will need to go to a doctor. It is recommended to visit a women's clinic for the prescription rather than a hospital. You will find it especially difficult to secure an EC prescription at a Christian hospital. When you are seeking EC, it is customary that the doctor will ask some questions about your cycle, last period, etc. After they have written a prescription, you can bring it to a pharmacy ("yak-guk" in Korean).
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For dedicated EC that is anti-progestin, there's ellaOne (take 1 pill within 120 hours after unprotected sex). For dedicated EC that is progestin only, there's After1, Norlevo One and Postinor 1 (take 1 pill within 120 hours after unprotected sex). There's also Levonia, Levonormin, MS Pill and Sexcon One&One (take 2 pills within 120 hours after unprotected sex). If you absolutely cannot secure emergency contraceptives, you can use some oral contraceptives as EC instead. In Korea, there's Minivlar or Sexcon (take 4 pills within 120 hours after unprotected sex and take 4 more pills 12 hours later) or Alesse (take 5 pills within 120 hours after unprotected sex and take 5 more pills 12 hours later).<ref>[http://ec.princeton.edu/worldwide/ Princeton Emergency Contraception Website</ref>
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For dedicated EC that is anti-progestin, there's ellaOne (take 1 pill within 120 hours after unprotected sex). For dedicated EC that is progestin only, there's After1, Norlevo One and Postinor 1 (take 1 pill within 120 hours after unprotected sex). There's also Levonia, Levonormin, MS Pill and Sexcon One&One (take 2 pills within 120 hours after unprotected sex). If you absolutely cannot secure emergency contraceptives, you can use some oral contraceptives as EC instead. In Korea, there's Minivlar or Sexcon (take 4 pills within 120 hours after unprotected sex and take 4 more pills 12 hours later) or Alesse (take 5 pills within 120 hours after unprotected sex and take 5 more pills 12 hours later).<ref>[http://ec.princeton.edu/worldwide/ Princeton Emergency Contraception Website]</ref>
    
===Costs===
 
===Costs===
6,472

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