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==Contraception==
 
==Contraception==
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'''General Note:''' There are many types of contraceptives, also known as "birth control," including IUDs, oral contraceptives, patches, shots, and condoms, etc. If you would like to view a full list, click [https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/birth-control here].
    
===Laws & Social Stigmas===
 
===Laws & Social Stigmas===
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==Emergency Contraception==
 
==Emergency Contraception==
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'''Important Note:''' The earlier you take emergency contraception, the more effectively it will work. Take it as soon as possible.
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'''Important Notes:''' Emergency contraception may prevent pregnancy for three days (72 hours) and sometimes five days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Take EC '''as soon as possible''' after unprotected sex. If you don't have access to dedicated EC, oral contraceptives can be used as replacement EC, but remember the following: 1) Only some contraceptives work as EC 2) Different contraceptives require different dosages and time schedules to work as EC 3) You must only use the first 21 pills in 28-day packs and 4) They may be less effective than dedicated EC. For general information on emergency contraceptives, click [https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/morning-after-pill-emergency-contraception here] and [http://ec.princeton.edu/info/ecp.html here].
    
[[File:planB.jpg|300px | thumb|right|alt=Image provided by Creative Commons.|'''The most commonly used emergency contraception pill in the US'''.]]
 
[[File:planB.jpg|300px | thumb|right|alt=Image provided by Creative Commons.|'''The most commonly used emergency contraception pill in the US'''.]]
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===What to Get & Where to Get It===
 
===What to Get & Where to Get It===
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'''Note:''' The longest-lasting EC is currently [http://www.ellaone.com/ ellaOne]. It lasts up to 5 days (120 hours) after unprotected sex. Check to see if your country carries ellaOne. If your country doesn't carry ellaOne, copper IUDs may also prevent pregnancy up to 5 days after unprotected sex. If none of these options are available, and it's been over 3 days since you had unprotected sex, you can still take EC, which may work up to 5 days. Note that EC pills are not 100% effective and should be taken as soon as possible.
    
Nearly all NYC pharmacies should have Plan B. There are also many 24 hour pharmacies in NYC, for example Rite-Aid (408 Grand St) and Duane Reade (769 Broadway at E. 9th St) in Downtown Manhattan. For a full list of 24 hour pharmacies in Manhattan, check out this [http://manhattan.about.com/od/citylife1/a/24hourpharms.htm this link]. For Brooklyn 24 hour pharmacies, CVS pharmacies in Park Slope (341 9th St), Flatlands, East Flatbush (4901 Kings Hwy) and Midwood (2925 Kings Hwy). For Queens 24 hour pharmacies, there's CVS in Bayside (212 Northern Blvd) and Duane Reade in Downtown Flushing (13602 Roosevelt Ave).
 
Nearly all NYC pharmacies should have Plan B. There are also many 24 hour pharmacies in NYC, for example Rite-Aid (408 Grand St) and Duane Reade (769 Broadway at E. 9th St) in Downtown Manhattan. For a full list of 24 hour pharmacies in Manhattan, check out this [http://manhattan.about.com/od/citylife1/a/24hourpharms.htm this link]. For Brooklyn 24 hour pharmacies, CVS pharmacies in Park Slope (341 9th St), Flatlands, East Flatbush (4901 Kings Hwy) and Midwood (2925 Kings Hwy). For Queens 24 hour pharmacies, there's CVS in Bayside (212 Northern Blvd) and Duane Reade in Downtown Flushing (13602 Roosevelt Ave).
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Plan B pills typically cost between $35-$60/pill. If you can't afford Plan B, call up your local hospitals and Planned Parenthood. Some hospitals offer free pills, and Planned Parenthood does give free pills to some people in need. Also, consider seeing if Medicaid can cover the pill. There's also [https://afterpill.com/ AfterPill], which is a cheaper morning after pill, which costs $20 and can be bought online. Since you usually want to take the morning after pill as quickly as possible, it's recommended to only purchase AfterPill as backup for future events -- not if you're currently in need of a pill.
 
Plan B pills typically cost between $35-$60/pill. If you can't afford Plan B, call up your local hospitals and Planned Parenthood. Some hospitals offer free pills, and Planned Parenthood does give free pills to some people in need. Also, consider seeing if Medicaid can cover the pill. There's also [https://afterpill.com/ AfterPill], which is a cheaper morning after pill, which costs $20 and can be bought online. Since you usually want to take the morning after pill as quickly as possible, it's recommended to only purchase AfterPill as backup for future events -- not if you're currently in need of a pill.
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==Medication & Vaccines==
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==Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs/STDs)==
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'''Important Notes - Learn about PEP and PrEP:''' If you think that you've been recently exposed to HIV (i.e. within 72 hours), seek out PEP (Post-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a month-long treatment to prevent HIV infection after exposure, and it may be available in your city. Take PEP as soon as possible. For more information, click [https://www.aids.gov/hiv-aids-basics/prevention/reduce-your-risk/post-exposure-prophylaxis/ here]. If you are at risk of HIV exposure, seek out PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis). It's a daily oral pill that can prevent HIV infection before exposure. To learn more about PrEP, click [http://www.whatisprep.org/ here].
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===Laws & Social Stigmas===
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There are many low-cost and free STD testing services in New York City. They typically do not require appointments, and they run on a first come, first serve basis. So it is recommended that you arrange for a test on a day when you have time to wait to receive your tests and results. Some STD clinics also offer vaccines for meningitis, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B, as well as alcohol and drug treatment.
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===What to Get & Where to Get it===
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[[File:Gonorrhea-at-home-test-kit.jpeg|230px | thumb|right|alt=Image provided by Creative Commons.|'''One of the "at home" drug tests readily available in NYC.'''.]]
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The New York City Department of Health offers free, same-day STD tests at facilities around the city. You can also get STD tests at Planned Parenthood. There are also a few companies that manufacture STD tests you can buy online and take in the comfort of your own home. To learn more about the pros and cons of these tests and find out how to purchase them, [http://stdtestoptions.info/std-testing-in-nyc-3-ways-to-get-tested-without-seeing-a-doctor/ click here].
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===Costs===
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For all patients over 19 years old, the New York City Health Department does charge fees for STD clinic services. This means that, if you have an insurance policy, your insurance will be billed. However, if you do not have insurance or do not want to bill your insurance, you will be typically asked to pay a sliding scale fee based on your family size and yearly income. Note that you will not be asked to prove your income or family size.
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==Medications & Vaccines==
    
===Laws & Social Stigmas===
 
===Laws & Social Stigmas===
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===Costs===
 
===Costs===
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For yeast infesctions, Monistat 7 at Walgreens is $14.99 while Walgreens generic brand is $11.49 (which seems just as effective). For UTIs, you can expect to pay about $60 for the antibiotics. Chlamydia medication generally costs $10 but can go up to $50. Gonorrhea medication usually costs about $17 for a single dose. For uninsured consumers, some  medications may be steep, so you may want to seek out sliding-scale clinics.
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For yeast infections, Monistat 7 at Walgreens is $14.99 while Walgreens generic brand is $11.49 (which seems just as effective). For UTIs, you can expect to pay about $60 for the antibiotics. Chlamydia medication generally costs $10 but can go up to $50. Gonorrhea medication usually costs about $17 for a single dose. For uninsured consumers, some  medications may be steep, so you may want to seek out sliding-scale clinics.
    
==Menstruation==
 
==Menstruation==
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'''Note:''' In addition to pads and tampons, you can also use menstrual cups and menstrual underwear for your period. To learn more about menstrual cups, click [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Menstrual_cup here]. To learn more about menstrual underwear, click [http://menstrualcupreviews.net/best-period-panties-reviews/ here].
    
===Laws & Social Stigmas===
 
===Laws & Social Stigmas===
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Costs vary, ranging from $300 to free for one 'woman well' exam. Note that some clinics charge an additional cost for the pap smear, which may range between $55-$600. If you are an American citizen, you can receive an annual free gynecological exam under ObamaCare. If you are not a citizen or have already received your annual exam, there are cheaper options. Some clinics provide a flat rate for the entire examination while other charge an extra fee for the pap smear and associated lab work. At Planned Parenthood, a sliding scale fee is offered for low-income patients. Otherwise, it will run about $175/exam. Other clinics, like One Medical Group (in the Bronx) and Women's Health Resource (Manhattan), charge about $150-175, which is generally cheaper than other providers.
 
Costs vary, ranging from $300 to free for one 'woman well' exam. Note that some clinics charge an additional cost for the pap smear, which may range between $55-$600. If you are an American citizen, you can receive an annual free gynecological exam under ObamaCare. If you are not a citizen or have already received your annual exam, there are cheaper options. Some clinics provide a flat rate for the entire examination while other charge an extra fee for the pap smear and associated lab work. At Planned Parenthood, a sliding scale fee is offered for low-income patients. Otherwise, it will run about $175/exam. Other clinics, like One Medical Group (in the Bronx) and Women's Health Resource (Manhattan), charge about $150-175, which is generally cheaper than other providers.
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==Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) Tests & Support==
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===Laws & Social Stigmas===
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There are many low-cost and free STD testing services in New York City. They typically do not require appointments, and they run on a first come, first serve basis. So it is recommended that you arrange for a test on a day when you have time to wait to receive your tests and results. Some STD clinics also offer vaccines for meningitis, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B, as well as alcohol and drug treatment.
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===What to Get & Where to Get it===
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[[File:Gonorrhea-at-home-test-kit.jpeg|230px | thumb|right|alt=Image provided by Creative Commons.|'''One of the "at home" drug tests readily available in NYC.'''.]]
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The New York City Department of Health offers free, same-day STD tests at facilities around the city. You can also get STD tests at Planned Parenthood. There are also a few companies that manufacture STD tests you can buy online and take in the comfort of your own home. To learn more about the pros and cons of these tests and find out how to purchase them, [http://stdtestoptions.info/std-testing-in-nyc-3-ways-to-get-tested-without-seeing-a-doctor/ click here].
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===Costs===
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For all patients over 19 years old, the New York City Health Department does charge fees for STD clinic services. This means that, if you have an insurance policy, your insurance will be billed. However, if you do not have insurance or do not want to bill your insurance, you will be typically asked to pay a sliding scale fee based on your family size and yearly income. Note that you will not be asked to prove your income or family size.
      
==Pregnancy==
 
==Pregnancy==
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==Abortion==
 
==Abortion==
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'''Important Note:''' There are two main types of abortions: medical (also known as the "abortion pill") and surgical (also known as "in-clinic"). For medical abortions, you take a pill to induce abortion. For surgical abortions, a procedure is performed to induce abortion. For general information about medical and surgical abortions, click [https://www.plannedparenthood.org/learn/abortion here].
    
===Laws & Social Stigmas===
 
===Laws & Social Stigmas===

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