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===Laws & Social Stigmas===
 
===Laws & Social Stigmas===
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Emergency contraceptive pills (also known as morning after pills) are available in the DRC. The law states that they are available by prescription only,<ref>[https://www.cecinfo.org/country-by-country-information/status-availability-database/countries/congo-democratic-republic-kinshasa/ Congo, Democratic Republic (Kinshasa)]</ref> but it appears that it can be purchased without a prescription (based on testimony in reports).<ref name="drc_ecawareness" />  
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Emergency contraceptive pills (also known as morning after pills) are available in the DRC. The law states that they are available by prescription only,<ref name=":1">[https://www.cecinfo.org/country-by-country-information/status-availability-database/countries/congo-democratic-republic-kinshasa/ Congo, Democratic Republic (Kinshasa)]</ref> but it appears that it can be purchased without a prescription (based on testimony in reports).<ref name="drc_ecawareness" />  
    
Emergency contraceptive pills are not commonly used, with only about 1.9% of married women and 4.3% of unmarried women ever using it, according to a 2015 study.<ref name=":0" /> Emergency contraception is not fully integrated into family planning programs, where it is only recommended in cases of rape, incest, or issues of mental incapacity. There is also low awareness of emergency contraception among the local population, with about 22.6% of all women (ages 15-49) ever having heard of the method, according to a 2014 report. There is also limited distribution of emergency contraception in pharmacies, and some pharmacies experience stock-outs.<ref name=":0" />  
 
Emergency contraceptive pills are not commonly used, with only about 1.9% of married women and 4.3% of unmarried women ever using it, according to a 2015 study.<ref name=":0" /> Emergency contraception is not fully integrated into family planning programs, where it is only recommended in cases of rape, incest, or issues of mental incapacity. There is also low awareness of emergency contraception among the local population, with about 22.6% of all women (ages 15-49) ever having heard of the method, according to a 2014 report. There is also limited distribution of emergency contraception in pharmacies, and some pharmacies experience stock-outs.<ref name=":0" />  
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* Emergency contraceptive pills (also known as morning after pills) can be purchased at pharmacies, health centers, and hospitals.
 
* Emergency contraceptive pills (also known as morning after pills) can be purchased at pharmacies, health centers, and hospitals.
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* Some of the emergency contraceptive brands you can expect to find are Aleze EC, G-Nancy, Levonorgestrel Richter, NorLevo 1.5mg, Pilule S, Planfam, Revoke 1.5, Revoke 72, Secufem.<ref name=":1" />
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* It is important to note that some brands sold in the DRC have been approved by stringent regulatory authorities, like the WHO, FDA, or European Medicines Agency, but not all of them have. If you want to be on the safe side, you can look up a medication before purchasing it to ensure it has been approved by a large regulatory agency.<ref name=":1" />
    
===Costs===
 
===Costs===

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