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In New York, there are many birth control options available. You can purchase condoms (male and female) and cervical caps without a prescription at pharmacies. However, you need a prescription to obtain most other forms of contraception, such as birth control pills, implants, injectables, rings, and IUDs.<ref>[http://ocsotc.org/wp-content/uploads/worldmap/worldmap.html Global Oral Contraception Availability]</ref> <ref>[http://freethepill.org/where-on-earth/ Free the Pill: Where on Earth?]</ref> <ref>[https://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/health/health-topics/birth-control.page NYC Health - Birth Control]</ref> Birth control pills are legal for both minors (under 18 years old) and adults. Minors do not need parental permission to obtain birth control. When someone seeks out a birth control prescription, they must typically consult a health care provider, like a doctor, at a clinic, hospital, or family planning facility, like Planned Parenthood. This typically involves a basic consultation with a doctor. However, depending on your medical history, you may also need to receive a pelvic exam before getting the prescription. Once the prescription is written, you can usually fill the prescription immediately. If a special procedure is required, this will usually only be scheduled after the initial consultation/exam. Note for minors: If you go to a Title X clinic, your appointment, billing, and records will remain confidential.
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In New York, there are many birth control options available. You can purchase condoms (male and female) and cervical caps without a prescription at pharmacies. However, you need a prescription to obtain most other forms of contraception, such as birth control pills, implants, injectables, rings, and IUDs.<ref>[http://ocsotc.org/wp-content/uploads/worldmap/worldmap.html Global Oral Contraception Availability]</ref> <ref>[http://freethepill.org/where-on-earth/ Free the Pill: Where on Earth?]</ref> <ref>[https://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/health/health-topics/birth-control.page NYC Health - Birth Control]</ref> Birth control pills are legal for both minors (under 18 years old) and adults. Minors do not need parental permission to obtain birth control.<ref>[https://www1.nyc.gov/nyc-resources/service/1032/birth-control-for-teens NYC - Birth Control for Teens]</ref> When someone seeks out a birth control prescription, they must typically consult a health care provider, like a doctor, at a clinic, hospital, or family planning facility, like Planned Parenthood. This typically involves a basic consultation with a doctor. However, depending on your medical history, you may also need to receive a pelvic exam before getting the prescription. Once the prescription is written, you can usually fill the prescription immediately. If a special procedure is required, this will usually only be scheduled after the initial consultation/exam. Note for minors: If you go to a Title X clinic, your appointment, billing, and records will remain confidential.
    
===What to Get & Where to Get It=== <!--T:10-->
 
===What to Get & Where to Get It=== <!--T:10-->

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