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[[File:Flag of Canada.svg.png|400px | thumb|right|]]
 
[[File:Flag of Canada.svg.png|400px | thumb|right|]]
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'''OVERVIEW'''  
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'''INTRODUCTION'''  
    
In Canada, you will find an incredible range of health care options. Contraceptive methods, including condoms, pills, patches, shots, etc, are widely available. While contraceptives are not subsidized by the Canadian health care system for all people, you can find lower-cost pills and IUDs (including insertion) at public sexual health clinics. You can purchase emergency contraception ("the morning after pill") at pharmacies or obtain it at sexual health clinics. There are no formal age restrictions but pharmacists can refuse to dispense EC to people who do not seem "mature." There are many public sexual health clinics that offer STI tests. While some only cover HIV, other clinics can test for a range of STIs, especially if you make an appointment rather than dropping in. There is an HPV vaccination program in place. You can access Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP). Regarding abortions, they are legal and there are no formal restrictions. If you're not a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, you can expect to pay $300-$900 for the procedure, but there are some financial assistance resources available.
 
In Canada, you will find an incredible range of health care options. Contraceptive methods, including condoms, pills, patches, shots, etc, are widely available. While contraceptives are not subsidized by the Canadian health care system for all people, you can find lower-cost pills and IUDs (including insertion) at public sexual health clinics. You can purchase emergency contraception ("the morning after pill") at pharmacies or obtain it at sexual health clinics. There are no formal age restrictions but pharmacists can refuse to dispense EC to people who do not seem "mature." There are many public sexual health clinics that offer STI tests. While some only cover HIV, other clinics can test for a range of STIs, especially if you make an appointment rather than dropping in. There is an HPV vaccination program in place. You can access Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) and Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP). Regarding abortions, they are legal and there are no formal restrictions. If you're not a Canadian citizen or permanent resident, you can expect to pay $300-$900 for the procedure, but there are some financial assistance resources available.
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